Maria Puzone
Altre idee da Maria
Historically Inspired - Angela Clayton's Costumery

Historically Inspired - Angela Clayton's Costumery

Renaissance Costume Gown 15th Century with Byzantine influence

Renaissance Costume Gown 15th Century with Byzantine influence

Check out this website - an encyclopedia of the costumes in The Tudors. This is one of Anne Boleyn's dresses.

Check out this website - an encyclopedia of the costumes in The Tudors. This is one of Anne Boleyn's dresses.

isabel, michelle jenner

isabel, michelle jenner

Gold Metallic Coif

Gold Metallic Coif

Historical Fashion - Renaissance Era by bitbyacullen on Polyvore featuring dresses, gowns, costumes, medieval, vintage, long dresses, women's fashion, long dress, medieval gown and costume

Historical Fashion - Renaissance Era by bitbyacullen on Polyvore featuring dresses, gowns, costumes, medieval, vintage, long dresses, women's fashion, long dress, medieval gown and costume

Renaissance French Hood Tudor LARP Medieval by CadwaladrCostumes

Renaissance French Hood Tudor LARP Medieval by CadwaladrCostumes

Campana de francés Renacimiento, Tudor, Medieval, LARP, Anne Boleyn

Campana de francés Renacimiento, Tudor, Medieval, LARP, Anne Boleyn

“una privilegiada” por estar entre las actrices que, como Pilar López de Ayala, han encarnado a la reina: “Igual que no hay dos Ofelias iguales, cada Juana es distinta”.

“una privilegiada” por estar entre las actrices que, como Pilar López de Ayala, han encarnado a la reina: “Igual que no hay dos Ofelias iguales, cada Juana es distinta”.

Lady-in-waiting's ceremonial court dress, O. Bulbenkova's workshop, St. Petersburg, late 19th century. State Hermitage Museum, via Teatime at Winter Palace's Tumblr. According to the Alexander Palace Time Machine, ladies-in-waiting were married women who wore a green velvet court gown; they occupied a higher position in the Imperial Household than the maids of honor, unmarried women who wore crimson velvet. CLICK FOR VERY LARGE IMAGES.

Lady-in-waiting's ceremonial court dress, O. Bulbenkova's workshop, St. Petersburg, late 19th century. State Hermitage Museum, via Teatime at Winter Palace's Tumblr. According to the Alexander Palace Time Machine, ladies-in-waiting were married women who wore a green velvet court gown; they occupied a higher position in the Imperial Household than the maids of honor, unmarried women who wore crimson velvet. CLICK FOR VERY LARGE IMAGES.