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#Saxon

#Saxon

Shield patterns for Saxon / Vikings?                              …

Shield patterns for Saxon / Vikings? …

( - p.mc.n. ) The Jutland Peninsula showing the historic homeland of the Germanic tribes of Jutes, Angles and Saxons after the Roman departure from Britain in around 500 CE.

( - p.mc.n. ) The Jutland Peninsula showing the historic homeland of the Germanic tribes of Jutes, Angles and Saxons after the Roman departure from Britain in around 500 CE.

The 7th century gold belt buckle found at Sutton Hoo ship burial, near Woodbridge, in the English county of Suffolk.

The 7th century gold belt buckle found at Sutton Hoo ship burial, near Woodbridge, in the English county of Suffolk.

KS2 History Timelines- Anglo Saxons Timeline Posters

KS2 History Timelines- Anglo Saxons Timeline Posters

Silver early penny, Series Z, c. 715-20; the bearded and moustached face contrasts with the clean-shaven appearance of the previous coin. CM.1614-2007, De Wit Collection.

Silver early penny, Series Z, c. 715-20; the bearded and moustached face contrasts with the clean-shaven appearance of the previous coin. CM.1614-2007, De Wit Collection.

Anglo-Saxon England 449 to 1066 AD - The tunic ended between the hip and the knee and had either long or short sleeves. Clasps were not needed to hold the tunic together because when pulled over the head it would sit snugly around the neck without the use of lacing or ties, indicating that the garment was one continuous piece. A belt or girdle was usually worn with the tunic and might have had a buckle, and, as Owen-Crocker states, “pouched over the belt”.[8]

Anglo-Saxon England 449 to 1066 AD - The tunic ended between the hip and the knee and had either long or short sleeves. Clasps were not needed to hold the tunic together because when pulled over the head it would sit snugly around the neck without the use of lacing or ties, indicating that the garment was one continuous piece. A belt or girdle was usually worn with the tunic and might have had a buckle, and, as Owen-Crocker states, “pouched over the belt”.[8]

Typical Anglo-Saxon Burh, a type of fortification that developed to protect towns from other Germanic invaders such as vikings.

Typical Anglo-Saxon Burh, a type of fortification that developed to protect towns from other Germanic invaders such as vikings.

It is clear that the formation of a Pictish nation that united the peoples of Scotland was due to the arrival of the Romans.

It is clear that the formation of a Pictish nation that united the peoples of Scotland was due to the arrival of the Romans.

Kingston Down brooch, Anglo-Saxon, early seventh-century. The ‘step’ pattern recalls the centre of the St Mark carpet page in the Lindisfarne Gospels.

Kingston Down brooch, Anglo-Saxon, early seventh-century. The ‘step’ pattern recalls the centre of the St Mark carpet page in the Lindisfarne Gospels.

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