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The Monymusk reliquary dates from c.700AD and is one of the most precious objects in the National Museums Scotland collection.

The Monymusk reliquary dates from c.700AD and is one of the most precious objects in the National Museums Scotland collection.

Made in Scotland or Ireland toward the end of the eighth century, the original purpose of Ranvaik’s chest had been to house the bones of a Christian saint. (Photo: National Museum of Denmark)

Made in Scotland or Ireland toward the end of the eighth century, the original purpose of Ranvaik’s chest had been to house the bones of a Christian saint. (Photo: National Museum of Denmark)

Monymusk reliquary

Monymusk reliquary

Comb  Celtic (Scotland), 0-200 AD  The National Museum of Scotland

Comb Celtic (Scotland), 0-200 AD The National Museum of Scotland

A photograph of a cross

A photograph of a cross

Balmaclellan mirror - National Museums Scotland’s mirror was discovered at Balmaclellan in Kirkcudbrightshire, south-west Scotland.

Balmaclellan mirror - National Museums Scotland’s mirror was discovered at Balmaclellan in Kirkcudbrightshire, south-west Scotland.

Tara Brooch - detail

Tara Brooch - detail

Breac Maodhog Shrine, Drumlane, County Cavan, Viking Age, 11th/12th century (bronze) Title: Celtic  National Museum of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland bronze Medium: house-shaped shrine; plaques with clerics and other ecclesiastical figures; Early Irish Art; Description: Metalwork (incl. Silver and Gold)

Breac Maodhog Shrine, Drumlane, County Cavan, Viking Age, 11th/12th century (bronze) Title: Celtic National Museum of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland bronze Medium: house-shaped shrine; plaques with clerics and other ecclesiastical figures; Early Irish Art; Description: Metalwork (incl. Silver and Gold)

Pict with Drinking Horn    This 9th century warrior of the Pictish tribe drinks from an eagle, the ancient symbol of power.  From Invergowrie, Scotland and now in the Museum of Scotland, it is an unusually droll carving, certainly a caricature, perhaps in the category of the Scandinavian insult stones, which were carved as an artistic and bloodless "thumbing of the nose" to a perceived insult.  It is the earliest artistic rendering of drinking on Scottish stones.

Pict with Drinking Horn This 9th century warrior of the Pictish tribe drinks from an eagle, the ancient symbol of power. From Invergowrie, Scotland and now in the Museum of Scotland, it is an unusually droll carving, certainly a caricature, perhaps in the category of the Scandinavian insult stones, which were carved as an artistic and bloodless "thumbing of the nose" to a perceived insult. It is the earliest artistic rendering of drinking on Scottish stones.

A chieftain's penannular brooch (worn by both men and women) from ancient Celtic societies until today. This one can be found in Glasgow's Kelvingrove Museum.

A chieftain's penannular brooch (worn by both men and women) from ancient Celtic societies until today. This one can be found in Glasgow's Kelvingrove Museum.

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