Explore Mother Goddess, Ancient Artifacts, and more!

Figurine of a goddess Near Eastern, Anatolian, Early Bronze Age, 2500–2300 B.C. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Figurine of an Anatolian goddess, circa 2300 BCE. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Iran, 1st century BC    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Statuette of a female Period: Iron Age II Date: ca. early millennium B. Geography: Northwestern Iran, Caspian region Medium: Ceramic Dimensions: H. cm Classification: Ceramics-Sculpture Credit Line: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1964 Accession Number:

The Galgenberg Venus - said to be The oldest figurine of a woman apart from the Berekhat Ram figure ever found, was created around 30 000 B.C.

The Galgenberg Venus - Fanny The oldest figurine of a woman apart from the Berekhat Ram figure ever found, was created around 30 000 BCE.

“ Head of the bird-like woman from the bird-drawn wagon.  From Dupljaja, location Grad, Serbia.  Terracotta (15th BCE)

hierarchical-aestheticism: “ Head of the bird-like woman from the bird-drawn wagon Detail of and From Dupljaja, location Grad, Serbia Terracotta BCE) © Photograph by Erich Lessing ”

Female Worshiper, c. 1600-1500 BC Crete, Minoan, Middle Minoan III - Late Minoan I | Cleveland Museum of Art

Female Worshipper, c. BC Crete, Minoan, Middle Minoan III - Late Minoan Looks like a weeping angle with her wings clipped

Figure of a Goddess, 5th-4th centuries BC, Bronze, Umbria, Europe, Harvard Art Museums

centuriespast: “ Figure of a Goddess, 500 BC Sculpture Italic, centuries BC Bronze Overall: cm in.) Creation Place: Umbria, Europe Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M.

centuriespast:  Female Figurine  This figurine, one of the oldest statuettes ever excavated in Egypt, perhaps represents a priestess or a goddess dancing or performing ritualized mourning at a funeral ritual.  Medium: Terracotta, painted Reportedly From: Ma’mariya, Egypt Dates: ca. 3650 -3300 B.C.E. Period: Predynastic Period, Naqada IIa Period Brooklyn Museum

Female Figurine This figurine, one of the oldest statuettes ever excavated in Egypt, perhaps represents a priestess or a goddess dancing or performing ritualized mourning at a funeral ritual. Medium: Terracotta, painted Reportedly From: Ma’mariya, Egypt D

Statuette dating from the Late Minoan I, 1600–1500 BC, or early 20th century. Thought to be from Crete and made from ivory and gold. (Courtesy of the MFA, Boston.)

Minoan -- Statuette -- BCE -- Late Minoan Period -- Thought to be from Crete -- Ivory gold -- Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Amiash Idol,  Ancient Near East.  1st millennium B.C.E.  Terracotta.  Amlash refers to sites in the province of Gilan, Iran, along the Caspian Sea. Figures and animals were made in ceramic and bronze. The figures with "button" faces are thought to have been used in conjunction with burial rituals.

Northern Iran, Amlash terracotta idol of fertiltyl ca BC.

Female figure, Chalandriani type  about 2300–2000 B.C.  Greek Art | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Female figure, Chalandriani type Early Aegean, Cycladic Bronze Age, Early Cycladic II-III Period about B. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Mother Goddess (Matrika) Post-Gupta period, mid- 6th century, India. One of a group of 7 mother goddesses sprung from a Hindu male god. Despite their beauty, matrikas represent dangerous and malevolent forces—the devourers of children and bearers of sickness and disease. Though integral to early temple iconography, their power was so threatening they were marginalized, consigned to shrines beyond city boundaries. Their combined power is understood to be embodied in the mother goddess, Durga.

Mother Goddess (Matrika) One of a group of 7 …. Period: Post-Gupta period Date: mid- century Culture: India (Rajasthan, Tanesara) Medium: Gray schist Dimensions: H. 24 in. cm) via metmuseum

Diosa que llevaba una tiara colmena de Turquía, Alrededor del 8000 aC www.thebeegoddess.com

Turkish Bee Goddess 8000 bc Some of my favorite bee lore is found in Greek and Roman mythology. Before Dionysus was torn to pieces and ret.

Terracotta figurine of a fertility goddess, 13th century BC, naked, with ominent hips carrying a child. She has bird-like features, around her neck a multiple-layered necklace. Birds were thought to represent fertility at this time, as well as bulls and other horned creatures. The broken clay around her head represents ears and the holes are piercings. These figurines were found in both burials and settlements and were personal possessions buried with their owners in death.

Terracotta female figurine from Cyprus This terracotta figurine of a fertility…

Pinterest
Search