kolybanov - Сказочный мир Йона Бауэра (John Bauer)

“Herr Birre och Trollen” tale, from “Bland Tomtar och Troll” illustrated by John Bauer

The little red haired troll boy is named Humpe. Bauer used him repeatedly in his art and he became almost a stand in for the artist himself.

John Bauer, Humpe and his Trollmor - Mother's love, 1917 (not from an illustrated book)

For “Our Fathers’ Godsaga,” by Viktor Rydberg.

John Bauer’s “Tyr and Fenrir,” 1911

John Bauer-Tyr and Fenrir - Canis lupus - Wikimedia Commons. Artist John Bauer Link back to Creator infobox template Description Tyr and Fenrir in for Our Fathers' Godsaga by Viktor Rydberg Date 1911 (domaine public)

John Bauer, "Bergaporten"

Inspiring image art, fairytale, fantasy, illustration - Resolution - Find the image to your taste

"Tomtar Och Troll" by John Bauer - Swedish

Provides resources for self-study for animation professionals, students, educators and researchers.

One of John’s favourites is Humpe, a small troll with a gentle disposition and a longing for the light world of people. Humpe is almond-eyed, snub-nosed and red-haired like a little faun. He first appeared in 1912, in the fairytale Trollsonen som hade solögon och vart skogsman - a romantic saga about a troll-boy that appealed to John. John returned to Humpe in works such as the late watercolour Moderskärlek (Mother love), painted in 1917.

A selection John Bauer illustrations and art prints from Bland Tomtar Och Troll (Among Gnomes and Trolls), Our Fathers' Godsaga, Sagovarld, as well as designs and paintings.

Tomte illustration by John Bauer. The word "tomt" in Swedish means "homestead" or "lot". The tomte was the mythical caretaker of the farm and the family. Every home had one. You'd do best treating him as one of your own.

Tomte001

Tomte illustration by John Bauer. The word “tomt” in Swedish means “homestead” or “lot”. The tomte was the mythical caretaker of the farm and the family. You’d do best treating him as one of your own.

John Bauer's Die Göttersage der Väter Illustrations

Watercolor illustrations for the 1911 German translation of Swedish poet Viktor Rydberg's Fädernas Gudasaga, originally published in

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