Explore Flying Ace, Supermarine Spitfire, and more!

Best British flying ace of World War II, James 'Johnny' Johnson (James Edgar Johnson, 1915 - 2001) with a Labrador named Sally.  In the background Spitfire fighter Mk.IX (Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX).  Johnson first combat missions completed in December 1940 as part of 616 Squadron. During the patrol raids over occupied Europe, he claimed his first victory confirmed June 26, 1941 brought down to 'Spitfire» Mk.IIA Bf.109E German fighter over northern France

Best British flying ace of World War II, James “Johnny” Johnson (James Edgar Johnson, 1915 - with a Labrador named Sally. In the background Spitfire fighter Mk.

Battle of Britain pilot Neville Duke, who later broke the World Air Speed record, pictured with his Spitfire at RAF Biggin Hill in 1941

Battle of Britain pilot Neville Duke, who later broke the World Air Speed record, pictured with his Spitfire at RAF Biggin Hill in 1941

gnossienne: “ Flying Officer Neville Duke of No 92 (East India) Squadron. Duke was a Battle of Britain pilot and is pictured here with his Spitfire at RAF Biggin Hill in After the war, Duke.

Heinrich Ehrler (14 September 1917 – 4 April 1945) was a German Luftwaffe military aviator during World War II, a fighter ace credited with 208 enemy aircraft shot down in over 400 combat missions. which included eight in the Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter.

Heinrich Ehrler September 1917 – 4 April was a German Luftwaffe military aviator during World War II, a fighter ace credited with 208 enemy aircraft shot down in over 400 combat missions. which included eight in the Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter.

Gabby Gabreski WW II ace of aces

World War II in colour - England, circa 1945 Ace American pilot Lieutenant Colonel Francis S. Gabreski poses in a cockpit. The flags refer to the 28 enemy planes brought down by Gabreski.

Many young pilots accounted themselves dead men, though the premonitions failed to diminish their commitment. Before No 249 Squadron RAF was ordered to fly to RAF North Weald on 1 September 1940, F/O Richard GA Barclay overheard a fellow airman saying while packing for the move, "I suppose some of us here will never return to Boscombe." The 20-year-old pilot took a slightly more optimistic view, writing in his diary, "I think everyone is quite sure he will survive for at least seven days."

Many young pilots accounted themselves dead men, though the premonitions failed to diminish their commitment. Before No 249 Squadron RAF was ordered to fly to RAF North Weald on 1 September 1940, F/O Richard GA Barclay overheard a fellow airman saying while packing for the move, "I suppose some of us here will never return to Boscombe." The 20-year-old pilot took a slightly more optimistic view, writing in his diary, "I think everyone is quite sure he will survive for at least seven days."

︵‿⚜Ꭷᘎɬ Ꭷʄ ᏗʄཞįᏣᏗ︵‿⚜                                                                                                                                                      More

The night was still and Bianca was dreaming of a vintage plane .and taking off into the morning sunrise. flying low over the now familiar surrounding land.

The Allies' first air ace of WW2, New Zealander Flying Officer Edgar. ("Cobber") Kain was one of the greatest legends of the first year of the war. His successes in the air, coupled with his warm personality and charm, made him the media's favourite airman of late 1939 and early 1940.    He served with No. 73 Squadron, RAF, in France, where he is officially credited with shooting down 14 German aircraft between November 1939 and June 1940.

The Allies' first air ace of New Zealander Flying Officer Edgar. ("Cobber") Kain was one of the greatest legends of the first year of the war.

Reginald Mitchell the designer of the Spitfire

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works (which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from Reginald Mitchell Spitfire designer.

Pinterest
Search