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Mattiwilda Dobbs (born July 11, 1925) is an African-American coloratura soprano. She is the fifth daughter of John Wesley Dobbs, a prominent Atlanta leader prior to the Civil Rights Movement. She received her bachelor's degree in Music and Spanish from Spelman College in 1946, where she graduated first in her class. She earned a master's degree in Spanish from Columbia University in 1948.

Mattiwilda Dobbs (born July 11, 1925) is an African-American coloratura soprano. She is the fifth daughter of John Wesley Dobbs, a prominent Atlanta leader prior to the Civil Rights Movement. She received her bachelor's degree in Music and Spanish from Spelman College in 1946, where she graduated first in her class. She earned a master's degree in Spanish from Columbia University in 1948.

Irene and John Wesley Dobbs with their six daughters, all Spelman College graduates and the largest sibling set to graduate from the college: Irene Dobbs Jackson, class of '29; Juliet Dobbs Blackburn, class of '31; Millicent Dobbs Jordan, class of '33; Josephine Dobbs Clement, class of '37; Mattiwilda Dobbs Janzon, class of '46; June Dobbs Butts class of '48.

Irene and John Wesley Dobbs with their six daughters, all Spelman College graduates and the largest sibling set to graduate from the college: Irene Dobbs Jackson, class of '29; Juliet Dobbs Blackburn, class of '31; Millicent Dobbs Jordan, class of '33; Josephine Dobbs Clement, class of '37; Mattiwilda Dobbs Janzon, class of '46; June Dobbs Butts class of '48.

Gullah/Geechee Civil Rights Leader Septima P. Clark, founder of the "Citizenship Schools" on historic Johns Island, SC in the Gullah/Geechee Nation

Gullah/Geechee Civil Rights Leader Septima P. Clark, founder of the "Citizenship Schools" on historic Johns Island, SC in the Gullah/Geechee Nation

Undaunted by the Fight: #Spelman College and the #CivilRights Movement, 1957-1967 (Voices of the African Diaspora) by Harry G. Lefever #HBCU

Undaunted by the Fight: #Spelman College and the #CivilRights Movement, 1957-1967 (Voices of the African Diaspora) by Harry G. Lefever #HBCU

July 16, 1932: Louise Stokes, eighteen, and Tidye Pickett (above), nineteen, are the first African American women to earn Olympic berths on the U.S. women’s track team with strong performances at the Olympic trials held in Evanston, Illinois. The U.S. Olympic committee will replace the two with white women who had run slower times during the trials.

July 16, 1932: Louise Stokes, eighteen, and Tidye Pickett (above), nineteen, are the first African American women to earn Olympic berths on the U.S. women’s track team with strong performances at the Olympic trials held in Evanston, Illinois. The U.S. Olympic committee will replace the two with white women who had run slower times during the trials.

Charlotte Forten was born on August 17, 1837, in Philadelphia, PA. She kept a diary of her involvement with the abolition movement and became the first African-American hired to teach white students in Salem, MA. In 1862, Forten participated in the Port Royal Experiment, educating ex-slaves on St. Helena Island, South Carolina and recording her experiences in a series of essays. She died in 1914

Charlotte Forten was born on August 17, 1837, in Philadelphia, PA. She kept a diary of her involvement with the abolition movement and became the first African-American hired to teach white students in Salem, MA. In 1862, Forten participated in the Port Royal Experiment, educating ex-slaves on St. Helena Island, South Carolina and recording her experiences in a series of essays. She died in 1914

Mahalia Jackson "The Queen of Gospel" - gospel singer

Mahalia Jackson "The Queen of Gospel" - gospel singer

American lawyer and civil rights activist who founded the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973. Edelman attended Spelman College in Atlanta, Ga. (B.A., 1960), and the Yale University Law School (LL.B., 1963). After work registering African-American voters in Mississippi, she moved to New York City as a staff attorney for the Legal Defense and Educational Fund of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

American lawyer and civil rights activist who founded the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973. Edelman attended Spelman College in Atlanta, Ga. (B.A., 1960), and the Yale University Law School (LL.B., 1963). After work registering African-American voters in Mississippi, she moved to New York City as a staff attorney for the Legal Defense and Educational Fund of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Robert Tanner Freeman is the first professionally trained black dentist in the United States. A child of slaves, he eventually entered Harvard University and graduated only four years after the end of the Civil War on May 18, 1869.

Robert Tanner Freeman is the first professionally trained black dentist in the United States. A child of slaves, he eventually entered Harvard University and graduated only four years after the end of the Civil War on May 18, 1869.

Charles Coles Diggs, Jr. (December 2, 1922 - August 24, 1998) was the first African American elected to Congress from Michigan. Diggs was an early member of the civil rights movement. He attended the trial of Emmett Till's murders, and was elected the first chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. He attended Fisk University and the University of Michigan.

Charles Coles Diggs, Jr. (December 2, 1922 - August 24, 1998) was the first African American elected to Congress from Michigan. Diggs was an early member of the civil rights movement. He attended the trial of Emmett Till's murders, and was elected the first chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. He attended Fisk University and the University of Michigan.

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