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Aqueduct Segovia

Aqueduct in Segovia – the longest Roman aqueduct, preserved in Western Europe. Is located in the Spanish city of Segovia. Its length is 728 m, height 28 m

TALASO HOTEL SANXENXO Pontevedra - Web Oficial | Galería

TALASO HOTEL SANXENXO Pontevedra - Web Oficial | Galería

The Colosseum, Rome, Italy Walking around the colosseum, no words to truly describe the feeling.

The Colosseum, Rome, Italy Walking around the colosseum, no words to truly describe the feeling. A bit scary at night in the dark & they were closing

Tarifa, Andalucía, Spain.  http://www.costatropicalevents.com/en/costa-tropical-events/andalusia/welcome.html

Tarifa, Andalucía, Spain. http://www.costatropicalevents.com/en/costa-tropical-events/andalusia/welcome.html

Travel guide: Unlocking Cuba

Travel to Cuba: What you need to know

For travel to Cuba, here are the types of trips permitted by U. law, the necessary paperwork and more information for Americans.

Salamanca, Spain <3  "Salamanca que enhechiza la voluntad de volver a ella a todos los que la apacibilidad de su vivienda han gustado"

Study abroad in Salamanca with IES.

A little more than halfway on our 2 1/2 hour hike to Pasaia we came across the remains of an ancient Roman aqueduct. The history of this pla...

A little more than halfway on our 2 hour hike to Pasaia we came across the remains of an ancient Roman aqueduct. The history of this pla.

Capilla de la Mezquica Catedral de Córdoba.  www.bodebasmezquita.com

Fabio Lupo on

Capilla de la Mezquica Catedral de Córdoba. www.bodebasmezquita.com

La Giralda and Catedral de Sevilla in Sevilla, España

La Giralda and Catedral de Sevilla in Sevilla, España

roman arches | ROMAN ARCH BRIDGE

The Alcántara Bridge is a Roman stone arch bridge built over the Tagus River at Alcántara, Spain, between 104 and 106 AD by an order of the Roman emperor Trajan.

Ancient Spanish Monastery This medieval cloister was built in Segovia, Spain, in the 12th century. Following a social revolution in the 1830s, the monastery was seized, sold, and converted to a granary, until publisher William Randolph Hearst purchased the property and had its outbuildings shipped to the U.S. Dismantled and transported overseas in 11,000 wooden crates, the cloister was reconstructed in Miami following Hearst’s death in 1952.

Miami’s Must-Visit Historic Landmarks