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Chair | Chair, 1800s Equatorial Africa, Cameroon, late 19th century wood, Overall - h:80.70 w:53.30 d:44.50 cm (h:31 3/4 w:20 15/16 d:17 1/2 inches).

Chair, Equatorial Africa, Cameroon, late century Cleveland Museum of Art

Africa | Chief's stool from the Duala people of Cameroon | Wood | Early part of the 20th century

Chief's wood stool from the Duala people of Cameroon, Africa, early century

Africa | chair from the Luguru people of Tanzania | Wood | Early 20th century

High backed stool, Luguru peoples, Tanzania In East Africa, elaborate high-backed stools generally signify the governing authority of their owners; Source: National Museum of African Art

Stool   African, Cameroon, Duala peoples, early 20th century  Dimensions Overall: 36.8 x 23.5 x 49.5 cm| MFA for Educators

Stool African, Cameroon, Duala peoples, early century Dimensions Overall: x x cm

Chair with head on back and figures on rungs. Date: late 19th to early 20th century.  Angola and Democratic Republic of the Congo. Culture: Chokwe peoples

Chair with head on back and figures on rungs. Angola and Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Africa | Male figure. Bamum peoples.  Cameroon, Famban | Wood, brass, cloth, glass beads, cowrie shells | This life-size male figure from the kingdom of Bamum in Cameroon is a visually compelling example of the splendid beaded sculptures Bamum artists created for the royal court in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Africa | Male figure. Bamum peoples. Cameroon, Famban | Wood, brass, cloth, glass beads, cowrie shells | This life-size male figure from the kingdom of Bamum in Cameroon is a visually compelling example of the splendid beaded sculptures Bamum artists created for the royal court in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

A wood, brass and leather nineteenth-century Asante royal chair (akonkromfi, 'praying mantis') from Ghana; it is a symbol of rulership. (The Art Institute of Chicago)

A wood, brass and leather nineteenth-century Asante royal chair (akonkromfi, 'praying mantis') from Ghana; it is a symbol of rulership. (The Art Institute of Chicago)

Cameroun ~ "Cimier" Face Mask from the Tikar people ~ Bronze and Raffia - century

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