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Steel Stair

Exposed steel frames bolted with a matching staircase, creating an impression of structurally functionalism. if these steel frames were not in this picture the stairs would not stand on their own.

The front and back facades of this house are made up of layers of concrete planters cantilevered from the side walls. <br><br> Rainwater is collected and then used to water the plants by way of an automatic irrigation system. <br><br> This green screen shelters the home’s inhabitants from sunlight, street noise and pollution.

Stacking green / Vo Trong Nghia + Daisuke Sanuki + Shunri Nishizawa one of my favourite small site home projects stairs Architeture greenspace

Japanese interior #interior #japan

Design Bedroom Apartments Outdoor Style Restaurant Home Wood Slats Decor Small Spaces Living Room Hotel Kengo Kuma Office Kitchen Wabi Sabi Colour Window Soaking Tubs Lights Tiny House Zen Gardens Architects Kyoto Japan

Category » Gardening Archives « @ Page 17 of 607 « @ its-a-green-lifeits-a-green-life

hardwood planks keyed in to concrete - William Joyce Design – Landscape Architecture

Wheels carry the weight of large glass or wood panels up to 880 lbs on tracks set flush to the finished floor.

ASTEC an award-winning fitting which can carry very large sheets of glass. No milling of panels required. Engineered and precision-made in Germany, astec's systems offer complete systems and accessories in high-grade, highly finished stainless steel.

Escalera de madera y metal

Madera+metal: Dos materiales que se atraen

Stainless steel edge profile for floors GLASS PROFILE GPS1 - PROFILPAS

Search all products and retailers of PROFILPAS: discover prices, catalogues, and novelties

Image 14 of 31 from gallery of A2 House / VPS Architetti. Photograph by Pierluigi Dessì

Gallery of A2 House / VPS Architetti - 14

Photo: Tim Bies

folded steel stair without stringers providing circulation & a sculptural element by Olson Kundig Architects - Projects - Hot Rod House, Seattle

The “Kumiko” woodwork technique was developed in Japan in the Asuka Era (600-700 AD). Tanihata uses this technique to manufacture Ramma for room dividers and sliding doors. Wood chips are thinly and precisely shaved then carefully assembled chip by chip to construct Kumiko Ramma. Wood goes through a process of selection, grinding, splitting and assembling. Tradition is preserved through the craftsmen’s experience, skill and passion.

Kumiko: art technique of assembling small wooden pieces without nails / Shinichi Sugawara, Iwate, Japan

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