Explore Vintage Cameras, Vintage Ads, and more!

Kodak (Nagel) Pupille   Circa 1932 The Pupille was in the works when Kodak bought his firm.  This camera was marketed under both the Kodak and Nagel badges, as well as branded as the Rolloroy in Britain.   This camera was likely sold in Europe, since it does not have the Kodak logo on the lens front.  The Pupille uses type 127 film.  The two threaded socket to the left of the viewfinder accept a rangefinder.

Kodak (Nagel) Pupille Circa 1932 The Pupille was in the works when Kodak bought…

1907 "Youth's Companion" ad. Brownie Cameras.

Kodak’s Brownie cameras – So simple that any boy or girl can operate them, so perfect in lens and shutter that they are capable of making most excellent pictures -such are the

Kodak Brownie.  This is what I remember taking pictures with as a kid. Seeing the picture upside down while looking into the viewfinder.

Who's That Kodak Girl? Early Camera Ads Depict Women as Adventurous Shutterbugs. Kodak instruction booklets were often pitched directly to young girls.

Companies like Kodak, Comet & HMV struggled with the move to  digital formats for their main activity and lost ground to those who made better use of the opportunities digital technologies afforded. Are academic writers now in the same situation? How will they cope with the challenges that even these technology companies couldn't overcome?

Companies like Kodak, Comet & HMV struggled with the move to digital formats for their main activity and lost ground to those who made better use of the opportunities digital technologies afforded. Are academic writers now in the same situation? How will they cope with the challenges that even these technology companies couldn't overcome?

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