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Christine Paul - Chitimacha weaver from How Native And Non-Native Louisiana Women Found Power In Basketry | WWNO

Christine Paul - Chitimacha weaver from How Native And Non-Native Louisiana Women Found Power In Basketry

Clara Darden, sole surviving Chitimacha practitioner of the intricate double-weave technique producing a basket in two continuous layers of river cane, one inside the other. (at the reservation at Charenton, in the isolated bayous west of New Orleans)

Clara Darden, sole surviving Chitimacha practitioner of the intricate double-weave technique producing a basket in two continuous layers of river cane, one inside the other. (at the reservation at Charenton, in the isolated bayous west of New Orleans)

PEACE PIPE CEREMONY, 1718. Chitimacha Native Americans in Louisiana on their way to take part in the calumet ceremony upon the conclusion of peace with the French in 1718. Copper engraving, French, 1758, after a drawing by Antoine Simon Le Page du Pratz.

22x18 (58x48cm) Framed Print of PEACE PIPE CEREMONY, 1718. /nChitimacha Native Americans in Louisiana on their way to take part in the calumet ceremony upon the conclusion of peace with the French in 1718. Copper engraving, French, 1758, after a drawing by Antoine Simon Le Page du Pratz

PEACE PIPE CEREMONY, Chitimacha Native Americans in Louisiana on their way to take part in the calumet ceremony upon the conclusion of peace with the French in Copper engraving, French, after a drawing by Antoine Simon Le Page du Pratz.

The Bayou Teche  The Bayou Teche got its name from an old Chitimacha Indian legend. According to that tale, there once was a very large snake who roamed the area and terrified many people. He was finally slayed and as his body collapsed into the earth, it carved out the bayou into the shape of a snake.

The Bayou Teche The Bayou Teche got its name from an old Chitimacha Indian legend. According to that tale, there once was a very large snake who roamed the area and terrified many people. He was finally slayed and as his body collapsed into the earth, it carved out the bayou into the shape of a snake.

Native women of Louisiana

Ernestine Darden Walls (left) and Lydia Darden (right) - both deceased - were master river cane weavers of the Chitimacha tribe. From Louisiana's Native Americans: An Overview

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