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Black Horse with wife and daughter - Comanche - 1875

Black Horse, wife and child in native costume, confined in Fort Marion, St.

Native American

Comanche man Ako, in native regalia. Photographed in - National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. Glass Negatives of Indians (Collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology)

Lakota Warrior Crazy Horse - Crazy Horse is known as one of the bravest warriors of his time. He entered each battle with the cry “Today is a good day to die!”, not as a death wish, but to show his absolute fearlessness in the face of peril

FOODS YOU CAN REGROW FROM SCRAPS AND VERY HELPFUL HEALTH INFO.!

Celebrated for his ferocity in battle, Crazy Horse was recognized among his own people as a visionary leader committed to preserving the traditions and values of the Lakota way of life.

COMANCHE GIRL , 1927

Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian - volume 19 facing: page 188 A little Comanche

Chief Mam-sook-a-wat (Mamsookewat/Mumsookawa/Mum-Shu-Kawa/Mam-Sook-A-Wat/Mom-suk-awa), Niuam (Comanche) 1908

Chief Mam-sook-a-wat (Mamsookewat/Mumsookawa/Mum-Shu-Kawa/Mam-Sook-A-Wat/Mom-suk-awa), Niuam (Comanche) 1908

1912 A medicine man of the Blood tribe standing in front of a teepee. Arthur Rafton-Canning took many photographs of the people of the Blackfoot Confederacy. As was typical of the time, these were copied by postcard manufacturers across North America and sold without credit or compensation to Rafton-Canning.

1912 A medicine man of the Blood (Blackfoot) tribe standing in front of a teepee. Arthur Rafton-Canning took many photographs of the people of the Blackfoot Confederacy.

Ho-Wea (aka Gap In The Woods) - Yamperico Comanche - circa 1872

Ho-Wea (aka Gap In The Woods) - Yamperico Comanche - circa 1872

Chief Washakie Chief Washakie was born to a Flathead (Salish) father and and Lemhi Shoshone mother.His prowess in battle, his efforts for peace, and his commitment to his people's welfare made him one of the most respected leaders in Native American history. Upon his death in 1900, he became the only known Native American to be given a full military funeral.

Chief Washakie was born to a Flathead (Salish) father and and Lemhi Shoshone mother.His prowess in battle, his efforts for peace, and his commitment to his people's welfare made him one of the most respected leaders in Native American history.

Vintage Native American

L-R Stopped With Horses, Human Chief, Horse Sitting In The West, Good Chief, Difficult Chief - Pawnee - 1868

Pah-Ute (Paiute) Indian group, near Cedar, Utah, in 1872. (Timothy O'Sullivan/National Archives and Records Administration)

Pah-Ute (Paiute) Indian group, near Cedar, Utah, in 1872 In Focus - The American West, 150 Years Ago - The Atlantic

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