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Magdalensberg/Kärnten: Freigelände & Museum. Graticula

Magdalensberg/Kärnten: Freigelände & Museum. Graticula

The Romans mostly ate with their fingers. When they were served dished that required utensils, they used spoons and knives. Although forks were  common utensils in the villa, they were usually reserved for cooking use only.

SPAIN / HISPANIA (Roman Spain) - The Romans mostly ate with their fingers. When they were served dished that required utensils, they used spoons and knives. Although forks were common utensils in the villa, they were usually reserved for cooking use only.

Ancient Roman Kitchen - http://www.inblogg.com/ancient-roman-kitchen/

in jewry wall museum Leicester Uk. The table, frying pan and shelves haven't changed much in about 2000 years. Pretty bad photo sharpened which makes it worse. It was gloomy.

The long straight roads built by the Romans have, in many cases, become just as famous as their greatest emperors. Roman engineers were audacious in their plans to join one point to another in as straight a line as possible. Consequently, roads used bridges, tunnels, & other architectural & engineering tricks to create a series of breathtaking but practical monuments which spread from Portugal to Constantinople. The network of Roman roads covered over 120,000 km. (Info by Mark Cartwright)…

Roman Roads

The long straight roads built by the Romans wherever they conquered have, in many cases, become just as famous names in history as their greatest emperors and generals. Building upon more ancient routes.

Fascia con grande varietà di vasellame e cibi - Antakya Museum

Antakya dec 2008 by Dick Osseman

Fork Date: 1st–4th century Culture: Roman Medium: Copper alloy Dimensions: Overall: 4 3/4 x 13/16 x 3/8 in. (12.1 x 2.1 x 0.9 cm) Classification: Metalwork-Bronze

Fork Date: century Culture: Roman Medium: Copper alloy Dimensions: Overall: 4 x x in. x x cm) Classification: Metalwork-Bronze

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