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Trachemys scripta

Pond Slider (Trachemys scripta) - Reptiles of Arizona

Blanding’s turtle (Emydoidea blandingii). Distribution: Canada, USA; requires both wetland and upland habitat.  Population: Endangered (IUCN 2011); decreasing population trend; populations  often small and localized; estimated 30–50% of suitable habitat  and populations lost in recent decades; many remaining populations have  declined.  Threats: International and domestic pet trade; habitat degradation, fragmentation,  destruction; predation; road mortality; bycatch…

Discover Life's page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Emydoidea blandingii image

Batagur kachuga | Testudinata.com

La batagur kachuga, une espèce en danger critique d’extinction

Three species of turtles in Maine petitioned for Endangered Species Act protection

Three species of turtles in Maine petitioned for Endangered Species Act protection

Alabama map turtle - Wikipedia

Alabama Map Turtle , Graptemys pulchra Alabama Map Turtles are only common to a few states in the southeast United States.

Giant Tortoises in pond Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador // Photo by Sean Crane

earthandanimals: Giant Tortoises in pond Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador Photo by Sean Crane.

Common Musk Turtle (Sternotherus odoratus) Photo © Jim Harding In Michigan, mostly inhabits clear lakes with sand or marl bottoms. Rarely bask, are generally seen foraging along the bottom in shallow water. May be nocturnal in summer. They eat snails, crayfish, insects, tadpoles, etc. If disturbed, glands along lower edge of shell secrete a foul-smelling musk, hence the common name "stinkpot." Common in southern Lower Peninsula, but threatened by lakeshore development.

Common Musk Turtle (Sternotherus odoratus) Photo © Jim Harding In Michigan, mostly inhabits clear lakes with sand or marl bottoms. Rarely bask, are generally seen foraging along the bottom in shallow water. May be nocturnal in summer. They eat snails, crayfish, insects, tadpoles, etc. If disturbed, glands along lower edge of shell secrete a foul-smelling musk, hence the common name "stinkpot." Common in southern Lower Peninsula, but threatened by lakeshore development.