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WEB OF WYRD | Wyrd is a feminine noun, and its Norse cognate urðr means "fate".

Web of Wyrd."Wyrd is a feminine noun, and its Norse cognate urðr, besides meaning "fate""

The Sigil of the Cosmos                                                       …

VEGVISIR COMPASS: the Norse symbol of protection. “Vegvisir” is icelandic for “guidepost”. They believe that the wearer of this symbol won’t get lost and will always find his/her way

Tree of Life Sigil. The Tree of Life is one of the most familiar of the Sacred Geometric Symbols. The structure of the Tree of Life is connected to the sacred teachings of the Jewish Kabbalah but can be seen in other traditions as well, such as the ancien

A Sigil Witch • “My mind is calm and my heart beat is steady”...

“My mind is calm and my heart beat is steady”Digital version of [this sigil]. Sigil requests are currently closed!

The Norns, Goddess's of Fate, they who cursed Sigyn for trying to change her brothers fate

Charites, known in Greek mythology as The Three Graces, goddesses of such things as charm, beauty, and creativity. In Roman mythology they were known as the Gratiae. The Fates were personified as three very old women who spin the threads of human destiny.

It is a Norse protection symbol called Vegvísir, which has a deep meaning. The Icelandic word literally means ‘guidepost’ or ‘direction sign’. In modern popular culture the Vegvísir is often called Runic Compass or See the Way. It is often associated with the Viking Age, which is not correct: this symbol is from the 17th century Icelandic grimoire called Galdrabók (‘magic book’).

Protection symbol Vegvisir on Björk’s left upper arm is a Norse symbol. Björk’s symbolic tattoo has a deep meaning. Protection symbols are often used in tattoos

Classic Illustrations

Snorri Sturluson,* writes: “Under the ash near the spring stands a beautiful hall; three maidens come out of this hall whose names are Urd, Verdandi, and Skul; we call them norns.

Verdandi is one of the three Norns (goddess of Fate) in Heathen mythology.  She is shown here standing beneath the world tree giving arms to an infant.  For more information of on the symbolism see the notes on the image.

Verdandi is one of the three Norns (goddess of Fate) in Heathen mythology. She is shown here standing beneath the world tree giving arms to an infant. For more information of on the symbolism see the notes on the image.

the norns in old norse mythology

The Norns (Old Norse: norn, plural: nornir) in Norse mythology are female beings who ruled the destiny of gods and men, and are comparable to the Fates in Greek mythology.

Carl Gustav Jung  spoke of an instinct to individuate, to grow from an inner seed into a tree. “My fate is what I am, and what I am is also why I am and what happens to me,” writes Liz Greene, summarizing Jung’s thought.

Carl Gustav Jung spoke of an instinct to individuate, to grow from an inner seed into a tree. “My fate is what I am, and what I am is also why I am and what happens to me,” writes Liz Greene, summarizing Jung’s thought.

Urd is one of the three Norns (goddess of Fate) in Heathen mythology.  She is shown here standing beside the well which bears her name which lies beneath the world tree.  For more information of on the symbolism see the notes on the image.

Urd is one of the three Norns (goddess of Fate) in Heathen mythology. She is shown here standing beside the well which bears her name which lies beneath the world tree. For more information of on the symbolism see the notes on the image.

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