Paul Nash: Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917...It has a less bleaker ,damper ,moodier feel to it than the winter trench ..though i think the darker ones represent the mood of the war more accurately.

Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917 (Art. IWM ART - Paul Nash (artist) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A new Paul Nash show, “the largest … for a generation”, is now open at London’s Tate Britain.It is appropriate timing in this period of World War I

Paul Nash, Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917 1918

Paul Nash and World War One: ‘I am no longer an artist, I am a messenger to…

Paul Nash and World War One: ‘I am no longer an artist, I am a messenger to those who want the war to go on for ever… and may it burn their lousy souls’

Paul Nash, Existence, 1917Paul Nash was 25 at the outbreak of the First World War. He would come to see himself as a messenger to those who wanted the war to go on for ever, creating some of the most devastating landscapes of war ever painted, his outrage at the waste of life expressed through his depiction of the violation of nature in landscapes that were both visionary and terrifyingly realistic.

Paul Nash and World War One: ‘I am no longer an artist, I am a messenger to those who want the war to go on for ever… and may it burn their lousy souls’

Paul Nash, Existence, 1917Paul Nash was 25 at the outbreak of the First World War. He would come to see himself as a messenger to those who wanted the war to go on for ever, creating some of the most devastating landscapes of war ever painted, his outrage at the waste of life expressed through his depiction of the violation of nature in landscapes that were both visionary and terrifyingly realistic.

paul nash war art - Google Search

IWM ART image: a view of bomb damaged Inverness Copse on the Western Front;

Paul Nash 1889–1946 The Messerschmidt in Windsor Great Park 1940 Pastel, graphite and watercolour on paper

Paul Nash The Messerschmidt in Windsor Great Park 1940 Pastel, graphite and watercolour on paper

Paul Nash, The Mule Track, 1918

Paul Nash and World War One: ‘I am no longer an artist, I am a messenger to those who want the war to go on for ever… and may it burn their lousy souls’

Wounded at Passchendaele by Paul Nash (1918)

Wounded, Passchendaele by Paul Nash. Nash was sent to the front in A sensitive boy, he was obsessed with literature, and to some extent, he felt as though he'd stepped into a novel.

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