Explore I Have A Dream, King Jr, and more!

Martin Luther King Jr's 'I have a dream' speech (1963

I Have a Dream Speech Site: The National Mall, Washington, D. people descended on the Lincoln Memorial as Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

27 Photos That Have Been Recolored And Brought Back To Life

Many of the most defining photographs ever taken were shot in black and white film, before color emulsions became commercially available in the

100+ Portraits of Iconic People of All Time

MARTIN LUTHER KING King was famous for his civil rights actions to bring about equality for African-Americans, including his famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered at the March on Washington in Date: Photographer: Howard Sochure.

The Loving family. Supreme Court considered the case of Richard Perry Loving, who was white, and his wife, Mildred Loving, of African American and Native American descent. The case changed history.

Nancy Green a former slave, was employed in 1893 to promote the Aunt Jemima brand by demonstrating the pancake mix at expositions and fairs. She was a popular attraction because of her friendly personality, great story-telling, and warmth. Green signed a lifetime contract with the pancake company and her image was used for packaging and billboards.

Nancy Green a former slave, was employed in 1893 to promote the Aunt Jemima brand by demonstrating the pancake mix at expositions and fairs. She was a popular attraction because of her friendly personality, great story-telling, and warmth.

Dr. King's Children Viewing his Body for First Time at the Funeral, April, 1968 | The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

King's Children Viewing his Body for First Time at the Funeral, April, 1968 The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

Marching on Washington is an American tradition

Today marks the anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s historic "I Have a Dream" speech.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, praying with some of his fellow civil rights activists as they prepare to peacefully march on 1 February 1965 (subsequently known as “Bloody Sunday”) in Selma, Alabama.

Martin Luther King Jr, praying with some of his fellow civil rights activists as they prepare to peacefully march on 1 February 1965 (subsequently known as “Bloody Sunday”) in Selma, Alabama. this is the only time you need to kneel.in prayer!

Written by Gandhi-King Community member Mary King. The original article can be found at Waging Nonviolence. How does one learn nonviolent resistance?

President Lyndon B. Johnson and Civil Rights leader, Dr. shake hands while President Johnson signs the landmark Civil Rights Act of

Forgotten Photographs of the Civil Rights Struggle

High School picketer Houston, Texas, May 1965 Unidentified photographer From "Freedom Now! Forgotten Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement" by Martin A.

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