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Chicomecoatl Goddess of Maize and Food    This great ceramic image of the Aztec goddess Chicomecoatl

This great ceramic image of the Aztec goddess Chicomecoatl is in the collection of the Anthropology Museum in Mexico City." Red was her color, and she is wearing a large hat made from wood and covered with bark (amate) paper.

Maize Deity (Chicomecoatl) | Aztec | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Among the many female deities worshipped by the Aztecs, those responsible for agricultural fertility held a prominent place. This sculpture depicts Chicomecoátl (seven serpents), a goddess of sustenance, especially of edible plants and corn

Tlaloc - Aztec rain god.

Ceramic vessel featuring Tlaloc (rain deity) by Pat Garcia

xochipilli

Xochipilli - Aztec God of Art. The god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers…

Vulture Vessel Aztec The Metropolitan Museum of Art “Ceramic vessels in the form of animal effigies were made in large numbers in many parts of Mexico throughout the Precolumbian era. Often used in ceremonies, the animals selected for depiction were...

Vulture Vessel Date: Geography: Mexico, Mesoamerica Culture: Aztec Medium: Ceramic The Met

This beautiful ceramic vessel was found at the Aztec Templo Mayor in Mexico City. It was an offering to Tlaloc

This beautiful ceramic vessel was found at the Aztec Templo Mayor in Mexico City. It was an offering to Tlaloc

The Feathered Serpent was a prominent supernatural entity or deity, found in many Mesoamerican religions. The double symbolism used in its name is considered allegoric to the dual nature of the deity, where being feathered represents its divine nature or ability to fly to reach the skies and being a serpent represents its human nature or ability to creep on the ground among other animals of the Earth, a dualism very common in Mesoamerican deities.

Aztec Head Mask Plaque Mayan Maya Mexico Mexican Statue Sculpture Wall Decor Art

The Feathered Serpent was a prominent supernatural entity or deity, found in many Mesoamerican religions. The double symbolism used in its name is considered allegoric to the dual nature of the deity, where being feathered represents its divine nature or ability to fly to reach the skies and being a serpent represents its human nature or ability to creep on the ground among other animals of the Earth, a dualism very common in Mesoamerican deities.

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