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Figurine  Neolithic Date: ca. mid-7th millennium B.C. Geography: Southwestern Anatolia Culture: Hacilar

Figurine Period:Neolithic Date:ca. millennium B. Geography:Southwestern Anatolia Culture:Hacilar Medium:Ceramic x x in.

Marble female figure Period: Early Cycladic II Date: 2700–2600 B.C. Culture: Cycladic

Marble female figure Period: Early Cycladic II Date: B. Culture: Cycladic Medium: Marble Dimensions: H.

Imagen de http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/01/MotherGoddessFertility.JPG.

Neolithic Ceramic Female Figurine Cucuteni-Trypillian Culture (in present-day Moldova, Romania and Ukraine) -- BCE -- Piatra Neamt Museum

Pech-Merle Cave and Museum: The Neolithic Mother-Goddess (the Universal Progenitor) dates from about 3150BC and was discovered in the town of Capdenac-le-Haut

Pech-Merle Cave and Museum: The Neolithic Mother-Goddess (the Universal Progenitor) dates from about and was discovered in the town of Capdenac-le-Haut Quercy France

Mother goddess figurine "Venus from Avdeevo", 40 km west of Kursk, Russia. Own cast.

Mother goddess figurine "Venus from Avdeevo", 40 km west of Kursk, Russia.

Avdeevo venus, the front view of the other member of the double venus. Photo: http://www.istmira.com/foto-i-video-pervobytnoe-obschestvo/3924-iskusstvo-predystorii-pervobytnost-2.html Avdeevo - a Paleolithic site with strong links to Kostenki

venus avdeevo statuette Avdeevo venus, the front view of the other member of the double

Sitting Venus (Magna Mater) of Hrádok, 1st half of the 4th millenium BC. Late Neolithic, Lengyel culture provenance: Šurany - Nitriansky Hrádok, West Slovakia

Sitting Venus (Magna Mater) of Hrádok, half of the millenium BC, detail 2 Late Neolithic, Lengyel culture height: 27 cm provenance: Šurany - Nitriansky Hrádok, West Slovakia

Stylized female figurine from Mezin. Photo: ©A. Marshack Source: Soffer et al. (2000)http://donsmaps.com/images24/mezinvenus.jpg

Stylized female figurine from Mezin. Photo: ©A. Marshack Source: Soffer et al. (2000)http://donsmaps.com/images24/mezinvenus.jpg

Figure of a Goddess, 5th-4th centuries BC, Bronze, Umbria, Europe, Harvard Art Museums

centuriespast: “ Figure of a Goddess, 500 BC Sculpture Italic, centuries BC Bronze Overall: cm in.) Creation Place: Umbria, Europe Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M.

SELÇUKLU HEYKEL SANATI - Türk Kozmolojisi

Uncommon art from Iran. Large Seated Woman and child. 12 in stucco. Perhaps the ancient Iranic goddess Anahita or a non-Islamic decorative figure. Seljuks were Islamic-Turks and their art contains Anatolian traditions

Seated figure Period: Neolithic Date: ca. late 8th millennium B.C. Geography: Syria

Neolithic Goddess Period: Neolithic Date: ca. late millennium B. Geography: Syria Medium: Limestone Dimensions: x in. x cm) Classification: Stone-Sculpture via >.

Calcite, 7th millennium B.C.E., From Mesopotamia  The female figure was of great symbolic significance during the Neolithic period, as attested by a proliferation of figurines in a variety of materials, here including stone, lime plaster, and clay. Although we cannot be certain whether these figures represent humans or deities, some scholars have identified them as representations of a Mother Goddess, possibly linked to the importance of fertile land in agricultural societies.

Calcite, 7th millennium B.C.E., From Mesopotamia The female figure was of great symbolic significance during the Neolithic period, as attested by a proliferation of figurines in a variety of materials, here including stone, lime plaster, and clay. Although we cannot be certain whether these figures represent humans or deities, some scholars have identified them as representations of a Mother Goddess, possibly linked to the importance of fertile land in agricultural societies.

Neolithic Mother Goddess Figurine Museum of Anatolian Civilization | by brewbooks

Neolithic Mother Goddess Figurine Museum of Anatolian Civilization | by brewbooks

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