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Bell and Star: Pollen, Seeds, Fruit: The Work of Rob Kesseler

Image from "Seeds:Time Capsules of Life" © Rob Kesseler, Wolfgang Stuppy & Papadakis Publisher

pollen - Yahoo Image Search Results

pollen - Yahoo Image Search Results

gallery-bloom17 | lidewij edelkoort

rob kessler, pollen, the hidden sexuality of flowers, micro natur photography…

semilla de Prenia tetragona

Bajo el Microscopio

A botanist in England has teamed up with an artist to capture vivid images of seeds.

Transit Contemporary Art Lounge:

Rob Kesseler, Canopy - 2008 - highly magnified coloured micrographs of pollen, seeds, fruit and leaves

Banking on life (Kew exhibition): Ornithogalum dubium seed

In pictures: The Kew Millennium Seed Bank

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Kesseler has spent the last decade working as a fellow at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens, photographing microscopic plant specimens including seeds, pollen, leaves and fruit.

A high-speed Pollen Spaceship amongst the trees and noses.

Pollen - this grain presents the same hexagonal pattern used by bees in a honeycomb - is this kind of reflecting the concept of "universe within universe"?

The thing in the centre is the centric diatom. The scaley things around are the coccoliths, or calcified scales, of the haptophytes Reticulofenestra clustering around it. The exact nature of this relationship is unknown, though presumably beneficial for the haptophyte, as R.sesslis is found almost exclusively attached to diatoms. Image by from nannotax.org; original citation - Gaarder & Hasle 1962 Nyü Mag Bot

Centric diatom with Reticulofenestra sessilis clustering around it. The exact nature of the relationship is unknown, though presumably beneficial for the haptophyte, as Reticulofenestra sesslis is found almost exclusively attached to diatoms

Childed Pink seed, collected in the UK. The seed is only 1.2 mm long. The large surface/volume ratio may assist wind dispersal.

Childed Pink seed, collected in the UK. The seed is only mm long. The large surface/volume ratio may assist wind dispersal.

U.K. artist Rob Kesseler is working with the Millennium Seed Bank to illustrate the remarkable, nearly invisible world of microscopic botany.

The Wondrous Beauty Of Microscopic Plant Seeds

artist Rob Kesseler is working with the Millennium Seed Bank to illustrate the remarkable, nearly invisible world of microscopic botany.

Kesseler has spent the last decade working as a fellow at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens, photographing microscopic plant specimens  including seeds, pollen, leaves and fruit. It’s a bit of a guessing game what the subject of each of these images are – some look more like amoeba than plants – so we’ll just have to take his word for it.

Prenia tetragona (Aizoaceae) seed, collected in South Africa, Cape Province

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