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slab of stone upon which was engraven a cross - Cerca con Google

Dyce, Saint Fergus' Church, Pictish Cross-slab No 2

The Woodwrae Stone (alternatively the Woodwray Stone) is a Class II Pictish Stone (ca 8th-9th C) that was found in 1819 when the foundations of the old castle at Woodwrae, Angus, Scotland were cleared. It had been reused as a floor slab in the kitchen of the castle. Following its removal from the castle, it was donated to the collection of Sir Walter Scott at Abbotsford House. It is now on display at the Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

wildeyedsoutherncelt: “ The Woodwrae Stone (alternatively the Woodwray Stone) is a Class II Pictish Stone (ca C) that was found in 1819 when the foundations of the old castle at Woodwrae,.

Fordoun cross-slab. (RCAHMS)

celtic-studies: “ In the vestibule of Fordoun parish church (at NO 7260 there is a Class II ‘Pictish’ cross-slab which had been used as the base of the pulpit of the church of The face.

Pictish stones are monumental stelae found in Scotland, mostly north of the Clyde-Forth line, and on the Eastern side of the country. These stones are the most visible remaining evidence of the Picts and are thought to date from the 6th to 9th centuries, a period during which the Picts became Christianized. The earlier stones have few surviving parallels from the rest of the British Isles, but the later forms are variations within a wider Insular tradition of monumental stones such as high…

Class I: Rough stones containing only symbols, dating from the to c AD. Dunnichen Stone, a Class I stone as you can see from the presence of symbols only.

The Dragon Stone, Portmahomack, Ross-shire - featured in The Dragon's Dove Chronicles by Kim Headlee

The Dragon Stone, Portmahomack, Ross-shire, Scotland - featured in The Dragon's Dove Chronicles by Kim Headlee

Aberdeenshire Council - Kinord Cross Pictish Symbol Stone

Research- the stone itself is an advancement both in stone etching, but also in the 3 dimensional creation of the circular piece encompassed by the cross. This was an architectural feat for this time, an advancement from carvings as pictured above.

The Picts were a group of Late Iron Age and Early Mediaeval Celtic people living in ancient eastern and northern Scotland.[1] There is an association with the geographical distribution of brochs, Brythonic place name elements, and Pictish stones.

Picts - The Aberlemno Kirkyard Stone, Class II Pictish stone

Deloss Webber - Artist

By Del Webber “knotting techniques from traditional Japanese and Native American basketry, wicker furniture, loom weaving, fly-tying, and nautical knotting. Each stone is selected and wrapped with a.

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