Explore Leeds City, Medieval Jewelry, and more!

A "significant" hoard of Anglo Saxon gold unearthed by a metal detector in a Leeds field is to go on show.

Anglo Saxon gold hoard to go on show

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork yet found. It was unearthed in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, England, on 5 July 2009. The hoard consists of over 3,500 items.

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork yet found. It was unearthed in a field near the village of Hammerwich, near Lichfield, in Staffordshire, England, on 5 July The hoard consists of over items.

Russian jewels of the 12th century. The big necklace is so called "barmy" that was the sign of nobles. Historically barmy is of Byzantium origin and came to Russia with the first embassies and brides to Russian Princes from Low Empire.

Prince and Princess Russian jewels of the century. The big necklace is so called "barmy" that was the sign of nobles. Historically barmy is of Byzantium origin and came to Russia with the first embassies and brides to Russian Princes from Low Empire.

Gold and enamel Anglo-Saxon roundel: gold tray inlaid with cloisonne enamel; depicting the right Hand of God in opaque white enamel. Late 10th/early 11th Century - found by an armature metal detectorist in Hampshire, England and currently housed in the British Museum.

Gold and enamel Anglo-Saxon roundel: gold tray inlaid with cloisonne enamel; depicting the right Hand of God in opaque white enamel. Late Century - found by an armature metal detectorist in Hampshire, England and currently housed in the British Museum.

Byzantine earrings, c. 600

Earrings Byzantine, 600 AD The Walters Museum “These dramatic, colorful earrings were most likely made in Constantinople, perhaps as an imperial gift to a Visigothic ruler of medieval Spain, where the.

Gold ring broochwith two rubies and four emeralds en cabochon. Late Medieval, 14th century. Made in: England. Found/Acquired: Enniscorthy Abbey. British Museum

century ring brooch from Enniscorthy Abbey, gold; set with two rubies and four emeralds en cabochon.

A gold finger ring that belonged to Æthelswith (855-889), the queen of Mercia and sister of Alfred the Great. She was also the daughter of Æthelwulf, who owned the ring . The ring was found in 1991 when a farmer was plowing in Northeastern England.

Gold Finger Ring -- Belonged to Æthelswith the queen of Mercia and sister of Alfred the Great. She was also the daughter of Æthelwulf, who owned the ring . The ring was found in 1991 when a farmer was plowing in Northeastern England.

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