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Hungarian soldiers on the Dolomitic front

tuttieroi

Hungarian soldiers on the dolomitic front, WWI

Taking a Pot Shot

"Dedicated to all the young men who answered their countries calls but never wanted war.

prima guerra mondiale 1915-1918 -  soldati Italiani al fronte sulle Alpi   #TuscanyAgriturismoGiratola

prima guerra mondiale 1915-1918 - soldati Italiani al fronte sulle Alpi #TuscanyAgriturismoGiratola

Italian alpine units climbing a steep slope during World War I.While World War I is particularly known for its trench warfare, one interesting part of WWI history was the Alpine wars of Northern Italy. Perhaps those who faced the worst conditions were the Italians.  Throughout most of the war Germany and Austria-Hungary occupied the high ground.  Thus Italian soldiers were often forced to make suicide attacks against highly fortified mountain top positions, suffering heavy losses.

Italian alpine units climbing a steep slope during World War I.While World War I is particularly known for its trench warfare, one interesting part of WWI history was the Alpine wars of Northern Italy. Perhaps those who faced the worst conditions were the

Austrian soldiers. Italian front

guns-gas-trenches: “ Austro-hungarian officers in the mountainous zone of the Italian front.

WWI: Austrian troops shovel snow to open the Nassfeld 'street' at Mount Gartnerkofel, alps. -Tweets from WW1 (@RealTimeWW1) | Twitter

WWI: Austrian troops shovel snow to open the Nassfeld 'street' at Mount Gartnerkofel, alps. -Tweets from WW1 (@RealTimeWW1) | Twitter

An Austro-Hungarian soldier on the Isonzo front, wearing straw shoes to protect his feet from the cold, c1916.

scrapironflotilla: “An Austro-Hungarian soldier on the Isonzo front, wearing straw shoes to protect his feet from the cold, ”

Austrian Soldiers having lunch on the Marmolada. 24 September 1917 (Österreichische Nationalbibliotek)

Austrian Soldiers having lunch on the Marmolada.

Number One enemy during WW1: MUD. A lone Allied soldier is attempting to cross the mud field somewhere in the Ypres Salient in late summer 1917. This type of moonscape was routine all along the trench lines on the Western Front. Mud going as deep as one meter was commonplace. Due to incessant rainfall, men could disappear in "sucking" mud holes along with draft animals and even whole carriages.

Post with 3694 views. 'Mud and barbed wire through which the Canadians advanced during the Battle of Passchendaele', Belgium, 1917 ×

MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS Ascending Pic Meije in Dauphin by martin2001

MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS Ascending Pic Meije in Dauphin by martin2001

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