Esplora queste idee e molte altre!

Esplora argomenti correlati

Africa | An Oshugbo society cloth from Nigeria | Cotton; woven in three strips with stylised snakes amongst horizontal geometric patterns in red, yellow and indigo on a cream ground

Africa | An Oshugbo society cloth from Nigeria | Cotton; woven in three strips with stylised snakes amongst horizontal geometric patterns in red, yellow and indigo on a cream ground

Ebira woman's wrapping cloth, Somorika, Nigeria, circa 1970. Hand-spun cotton, warp ikat

Ebira woman's wrapping cloth, Somorika, Nigeria, circa 1970. Hand-spun cotton, warp ikat

Africa | Baby carrier from the Ewe people of Northern Ghana | Cotton | ca. 1950 - 1970 - Actually not a baby carrier - these cloths were worn by girls at a coming of age ceremony.

Africa | Baby carrier from the Ewe people of Northern Ghana | Cotton | ca. 1950 - 1970 - Actually not a baby carrier - these cloths were worn by girls at a coming of age ceremony.

Envers du Decor

Envers du Decor

http://www.completecontroller.com/

http://www.completecontroller.com/

Africa | Veil from Morocco | Cotton/wool; woven with stripes and with a fringe at one end, dyed with a claret-red dye on one half

Africa | Veil from Morocco | Cotton/wool; woven with stripes and with a fringe at one end, dyed with a claret-red dye on one half

Africa | An Oshogbo society cloth.  Nigeria | Cotton; woven with diamond-shaped decorations in red and black, on a white background

Africa | An Oshogbo society cloth. Nigeria | Cotton; woven with diamond-shaped decorations in red and black, on a white background

Very rare mid C20th cloth woven from a white bast fibre called ebase in a remote village called Somorika high in rugged hills near the Niger-Benue confluence in central Nigeria. The fibre was obtained by pounding narrow branches of a particular tree in a mortar until they softened and broke down and could be spun to make a soft heavy thread.

Very rare mid C20th cloth woven from a white bast fibre called ebase in a remote village called Somorika high in rugged hills near the Niger-Benue confluence in central Nigeria. The fibre was obtained by pounding narrow branches of a particular tree in a mortar until they softened and broke down and could be spun to make a soft heavy thread.

NW517 - Woman's wrapper cloth from the Yoruba of Nigeria with a rare and undocumented pattern technique variation. On most Yoruba textiles, and indeed most West African textiles, pattern motifs are created using a technique called supplementary weft float in which an extra weft thread "floats" over part of the ground weave. On this cloth however..... http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/nigeriacloth22.htm

NW517 - Woman's wrapper cloth from the Yoruba of Nigeria with a rare and undocumented pattern technique variation. On most Yoruba textiles, and indeed most West African textiles, pattern motifs are created using a technique called supplementary weft float in which an extra weft thread "floats" over part of the ground weave. On this cloth however..... http://www.adireafricantextiles.com/nigeriacloth22.htm

British Museum; Af1981,09.5, Nigeria See Ethdoc 351 - letter Mrs J A Macdonald/M McLeod, 16.5.1981 '...I thought though, that you should know they [the textiles] are not from Cameroons. My grandfather, Walter Johnstone, brought them home just over 100 years ago and had been stationed in Calabar, Bonny and Opobo [so] that they must have been woven in one of those places, possibly by some of King Jaja's women as my grandfather was very friendly with King Jaja ...'

British Museum; Af1981,09.5, Nigeria See Ethdoc 351 - letter Mrs J A Macdonald/M McLeod, 16.5.1981 '...I thought though, that you should know they [the textiles] are not from Cameroons. My grandfather, Walter Johnstone, brought them home just over 100 years ago and had been stationed in Calabar, Bonny and Opobo [so] that they must have been woven in one of those places, possibly by some of King Jaja's women as my grandfather was very friendly with King Jaja ...'

Pinterest
Cerca