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Fifty years ago today on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, the American civil rights movement came to a violent and powerful climax in a day that would become known as "Bloody Sunday". Hundreds of predominately black protesters of all ages were attacked in broad daylight with tear gas, billy clubs and even whips by the Alabama National Guard and local law enforcement. They were subject to the violence for simply trying to exercise their First Amendment freedom in a march to shine a…

Fifty years ago today on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, the American civil rights movement came to a violent and powerful climax in a day that would become known as "Bloody Sunday". Hundreds of predominately black protesters of all ages were attacked in broad daylight with tear gas, billy clubs and even whips by the Alabama National Guard and local law enforcement. They were subject to the violence for simply trying to exercise their First Amendment freedom in a march to shine a…

March on Washington’s 50th anniversary - Edith Lee-Payne, of D.C., holds a photo of herself on her 12th birthday attending the March on Washington, which occurred Aug. 28, 1963. Sarah L. Voisin / The Washington PostT

Thousands on Mall commemorate March on Washington’s 50th anniversary

2013 Edith Lee-Payne of the District holds a photo of herself on her birthday attending the 1963 March on Washington. Voisin / The Washington Post

Participants Remember 1963 March On Washington

Participants Remember 1963 March On Washington

stereoculturesociety: “ CultureHISTORY - The Long Hot Summer c. The March on Washington c. 1963 Newark Riots c.

Protester at the March on Washington, March 18, 1963    The Afro-Anglican Archives are part of the Archives’ mission to acknowledge under examined aspects of the Church’s spiritual and cultural heritage, drawing on evidence of its continuing evangelization to people of color and the descendants of the African diaspora. Copyright 2011. The Archives of the Episcopal Church (DFMS)

young protester at the March on Washington, March 1963 // copyright The archives of the Episcopal Church (DFMS).

March on Washington, Steve Schapiro (1963)

The Women of the March on Washington, More than people descended on the National Mall for to hear speeches by civil rights leaders, clergyman, and others—including Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.

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