Explore Dyeing Fabric, Textile Dyeing, and more!

Dye Plants I: The Highly Coveted Madder Red

Dye Plants I: The Highly Coveted Madder Red

Herb art, cool!

Bloodroot as Plant Dye, Sanguinaria canadensis Bloodroot is a popular natural dye plant. The roots produce a yellow-orange dye and the stems produce orange-red dyes.

I love this type of illustration.  dye plants: woad, weld, madder.  Another for the herb book!!!

Antique print: picture of Plants used in dyeing - Woad, Weld, Madder, Sumach

Weld or Dyer's Rocket (Reseda luteola)  is a plant native to the Mediterranean.  Yellow dye was obtained from the roots by the first millennium BC, and perhaps earlier than either woad or madder.  I'm trying to find some here on Milos but no luck so far!

Weld or Dyer's Rocket (Reseda luteola) is a plant native to the Mediterranean. Yellow dye was obtained from the roots by the first millennium BC, and perhaps earlier than either woad or madder. I'm trying to find some here on Milos but no luck so far!

Madder is a perennial climbing plant with evergreen leaves and small pale yellow flowers. The roots can be over three feet long, and are usually harvested in 2nd or 3rd of growth. An ancient or heirloom dye plant; madder has been used throughout history for the brilliant orange and red hues it can produce. The root is utilized as a natural orange to red dye. With the help of a mordant (usually alum), madder is suitable to dye both plant and animal based textiles.

Madder, the Maddermarket in Norwich is were the crop was bought and sold. The boiled root produced madder rose, or Norwich red, as a pigment for dyes. Used also by medieval painters in retables at the Cathedral.

Pinterest
Search