Explore Japanese Mythology, Japanese Folklore, and more!

Oigakari- Japanese folklore: a shadow like being that jumps on the backs of people that walk through a dark alley. Its harmless except for the fact that it gets heavier with each step you take.

"something carried on someone") by Amakoma Touka. In midnight on a lonely road a heavy thing suddenly jump on walking people shoulders and cover them all from the back. It's a shadow yokai and cannot be seen clearly.

Buruburu Posted on Saturday October 18th, 2014 Today’s yokai is a really simple one! It’s one of the yokai that was clearly invented by Edo period illustrators; in this case, Toriyama Sekien. Those of you familiar with Japanese will know that there are many many more onomatopoeia words in Japanese than in English. Many every day feelings and emotions are described in Japanese using onomatopoeia rather than adjectives, which adds quite a bit to the color of the language. Fear, of course, is…

Today’s yokai is a really simple one! It’s one of the yokai that was clearly invented by Edo period illustrators; in this case, Toriyama Sekien. Those of you familiar with Japanese will…

Philippines' BALBAL __ In Philippine mythology, a Bal-Bal is a monster that steals corpses whether it is in a funeral or grave and feeds on them.

My Thesis: "The Creatures of Midnight" MEDIUM: Black Pilot Ballpen Staedtler Triplus Liner Balbal

Great overview of 18th century Japanese folklore demons (from "pink tentacle" blog)

Kerakera-onna) from "Kaibutsu Ehon", 1881 by Nabeta Gyokuei II Kerakera-onna are gigantic, horrid yokai found in red light districts, who get their name from the cackling sound of their laughter.

they-hide-in-the-dark:Yamachichi -A monkey-like creature from Japanese folklore, Yamachichi are believed to come from bats. It is said that when a bat lives a very long life that it can transform into a Yamachichi. These creatures resemble monkeys but they have pointed mouths and lips constantly poised for sucking. They usually live deep in the mountains but they will come down at night to visit houses. Yamachichi live on human life force. They will sneak into a person’s house when they are…

they-hide-in-the-dark: “Yamachichi - A monkey-like creature from Japanese folklore, Yamachichi are believed to come from bats. It is said that when a bat lives a very long life that it can transform.

A-Yokai-A-Day: Oboroguruma Posted on Sunday October 25th, 2015 Imagine this situation: you drive downtown for a summer fireworks festival. You find an awesome parking spot, with an elevated view over the river, where you will be able to see the sky and the reflection of the fireworks in the water. Just as you start backing into your place, some jerk pulls forward into the space and dings your car pretty bad. Today’s yokai is so relate-able to today that even though it takes place long ago…

Imagine this situation: you drive downtown for a summer fireworks festival. You find an awesome parking spot, with an elevated view over the river, where you will be able to see the sky and the ref…

Cuegle- cantabrian folklore: a tar black humanoid with three arms but with no hands. It had one horn and three eyes, each of a different color; red, green, and blue. It was about 4ft tall but immensely strong. It stole babies from their cradles. They could be warded off by placing holly leaves on the baby cradle.

Cuegle- cantabrian folklore: a tar black humanoid with three arms but with no…

Tlanusi- Cherokee myth: a gigantic leech the size of a house. It lived in a river in North Carolina. It supposedly crawled into the water, which bubbled and foamed. The water then erupted into a water spout and washed its prey down that was standing on the bank. It ate the ears and nose of its victims.

Gifts of the God Mages May 2012 - ongoing Pathfinder Episode Two: The Demon Child As my second session of the Indigo-Enter.

Kee Wakw- Abenaki myth: half animal, half human giants who ate people. They dwelled in woodlands. They were once human, but were transformed because their hearts turned to ice by some dreadful crime.

art by Jorge Corona Kee Wakw- Abenaki myth: half animal, half human giants who ate people. They dwelled in woodlands. They were once human, but were transformed because their hearts turned to ice by some dreadful crime.

Kawauso- Japanese folklore: river otters that shapeshift into humans to eat them or play tricks on them.

Kawauso- Japanese folklore: river otters that shapeshift into humans to eat them or play tricks on them.

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