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The very first Ferraris in 1947 were designated the 125 for their displacement of 125cc per cylinder. That engine quickly evolved into the 159, and then the 166. This car was a very early Spider Corsa, originally chassis 01C, and was rebuilt as 0101 (carefully observation of the serial number suggests the "C" was changed to a "0", and the "1" added at the end). It was then sold to Count Igor Troubertzkoy in Paris, who actively races the car.

The very first Ferraris in 1947 were designated the 125 for their displacement of 125cc per cylinder. That engine quickly evolved into the 159, and then the 166. This car was a very early Spider Corsa, originally chassis 01C, and was rebuilt as 0101 (carefully observation of the serial number suggests the "C" was changed to a "0", and the "1" added at the end). It was then sold to Count Igor Troubertzkoy in Paris, who actively races the car.

1953 375MM with Vignale bodywork with a non stock tailfin (added afterward) was driven by Phil Hill to a second place finish in the 1954 Carrera Panamericana.

1953 with Vignale bodywork with a non stock tailfin (added afterward) was driven by Phil Hill to a second place finish in the 1954 Carrera Panamericana.

Ferrari designed two of these exotic racers for the 1955 @Carrera_Panamericana, using 4.9 liter V12, with four camshafts, six carburetors, and 24 spark-plugs. After the 1955 Mexican race was canceled the car was raced in Buenos Aires by Juan Manuel Fangio , then sold to John Edgar, a major figure in American road racing. Carroll Shelby, races this car to at least eight wins.

Ferrari designed two of these exotic racers for the 1955 @Carrera_Panamericana, using 4.9 liter V12, with four camshafts, six carburetors, and 24 spark-plugs. After the 1955 Mexican race was canceled the car was raced in Buenos Aires by Juan Manuel Fangio , then sold to John Edgar, a major figure in American road racing. Carroll Shelby, races this car to at least eight wins.

After the very early 166 Spyder Corsa, which used a cycle-fendered bodywork, Carrozzeria Touring designed a small, taut streamlined body for the 166 chassis. This car was dubbed the 'Barchetta' ('little boat'). Tommy Lee, a wealthy West Coast automotive enthusiast who had owned a number of exotic European cars, ordered this Barchetta, which had been shown at the 1948 Turin Auto Show. This was the first Ferrari in the United States

After the very early 166 Spyder Corsa, which used a cycle-fendered bodywork, Carrozzeria Touring designed a small, taut streamlined body for the 166 chassis. This car was dubbed the 'Barchetta' ('little boat'). Tommy Lee, a wealthy West Coast automotive enthusiast who had owned a number of exotic European cars, ordered this Barchetta, which had been shown at the 1948 Turin Auto Show. This was the first Ferrari in the United States

For 1954 Enzo Ferrari needed more power for his front line sports cars, so he built a successor to the 1953 375MM called the 375 Plus. There were a half dozen of these cars constructed, using a 4.9 liter version of the 4.5 liter motor of the 375MM. With one notable exception the 375 Plus was not successful in the hands of Scuderia Ferrari with the cars being sold off during season to private owners in the United States and South America. The exception in terms of racing success was the car…

For 1954 Enzo Ferrari needed more power for his front line sports cars, so he built a successor to the 1953 called the 375 Plus. There were a half dozen of these cars constructed, using a liter version of the liter motor of the

The red car above is a Ferrari 250 Sport, the only one built.

The red car above is a Ferrari 250 Sport, the only one built.

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