Explore Cato The Elder, Carrara Marble, and more!

Marcus Porcius Cato Uticensis (95 BC, Rome – April 46 BC, Utica), commonly known as Cato the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather (Cato the Elder), was a politician and statesman in the late Roman Republic, and a follower of the Stoic philosophy. A noted orator, he is remembered for his stubbornness and tenacity, as well as his immunity to bribes, his moral integrity, and his famous distaste for the ubiquitous corruption of the period.

* Marcus Porcius Cato Uticensis* Cato the Younger. (* Roma, 95 d.

A statue of Lucius Verus, who ruled ancient Rome alongside his more famous adopted brother Marcus Aurelius, was recently recovered among a cache of looted artifacts, Italian officials say.  Investigators found the intricately carved marble head in a boathouse near Rome, saying the find was particularly significant because Lucius was reluctant to pose for official portraits. Only four other depictions of Lucius are known to exist, experts said.

A statue of Lucius Verus, who ruled ancient Rome alongside his more famous adopted brother Marcus Aurelius, was recently recovered among a cache of looted artifacts.

Three Roman pugios with (from left to right) the famous Leeuwen pugio with a type A sheath, type B tang, and type B blade. Next is a type A blade with a broken grip, and the last is a heavily decorated pugio with a type A sheath and type B blade.  ROME / ROMANS : More At FOSTERGINGER @ Pinterest

Three Roman pugios with (from left to right) the famous Leeuwen pugio with a type A sheath, type B tang, and type B blade. Next is a type A blade with a broken grip, and the last is a heavily decorated pugio with a type A sheath and type B blade.

In Rome fasces represented the power of certain magistrates who could order the beating of a criminal. The judges assistants, called licteurs, did the work with sticks. These fasces became the symbol of union and accord.

In Rome fasces represented the power of certain magistrates who could order the beating of a criminal. The judges assistants, called licteurs, did the work with sticks. These fasces became the symbol of union and accord.

The Preatorian guard of Augustus, Roman relief (marble), 1st century AD, (Musée du Louvre, Paris).

The Preatorian guard of Augustus, Roman relief (marble), century AD, (Musée…

The tombstone of a centurion, Colchester Castle Museum, Camulodunum (Roman Colchester) Here is Marcus Favonius Facilis, a Roman army officer of Legion XX. MARCUS FAVONIUS FACILIS SON OF MARCUS OF THE POLLIAN TRIBE CENTURION OF THE TWENTIETH LEGION VERECUNDUD AND NOVICIUS HIS FREEDMEN SET UP THIS HERE HE LIES Foto: carolemadge1

The tombstone of a centurion, Colchester Castle Museum, Camulodunum (Roman Colchester) Here is Marcus Favonius Facilis, a Roman army officer of Legion XX. MARCUS FAVONIUS FACILIS SON OF MARCUS OF THE POLLIAN TRIBE CENTURION OF THE TWENTIETH LEGION VERECUNDUD AND NOVICIUS HIS FREEDMEN SET UP THIS HERE HE LIES Foto: carolemadge1

Closeup of a Bust of Lucius Junius Brutus one of the first co-consuls of the Roman Republic by Ludovico Lombardo 1550 CE Bronze, a photo by mharrsch

Closeup of a Bust of Lucius Junius Brutus one of the first co-consuls of the Roman Republic by Ludovico Lombardo 1550 CE Bronze, a photo by mharrsch

Representation of the lupercal: Romulus and Remus fed by a she-wolf, surrounded by representations of the Tiber and the Palatine. Panel from an alter dedicated to the divine couple of Mars and Venus. Marble, Roman artwork of the end of the reign of Trajan (98-117 CE), later re-used under the Hadrianic era (117-132 CE) as a base for a statue of Silvan. From the portico of the Piazzale dei Corporazioni in Ostia Antica.

Marble altar with depictions of Mars and Venus and of Romulus and Remus suckled by the wolf.

Pinterest
Search