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Japan  Dutchman Holding Dog, 18th century  Netsuke, Ivory with staining, sumi, inlays

Japan Dutchman Holding Dog, century Netsuke, Ivory with staining, sumi, inlays

Spirit Foxes and Raunchy Demons in Japanese Netsuke Art

Spirit Foxes and Raunchy Demons in Japanese Netsuke Art

Monkey Songoku, late century Netsuke, Wood with precious and semiprecious stone inlays, 4 x 1 x 1 in. x x cm) Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection

Hunter and Prey, late 18th century  Netsuke, Ivory with staining, sumi, inlays,

Japan Hunter and Prey, late century Netsuke, Ivory with staining, sumi,

Netsuke: Ancient Pocket Charms from Edo Japan

Netsuke: Ancient Pocket Charms from Edo Japan

British Museum, Japanese Art, Asian Art, Oriental, Label, Asia, Japan Art

Tadamori and the Oil Thief, early 19th century  Netsuke, Ivory with staining, sumi, inlays

Tadamori and the Oil Thief Netsuke ~ Chingendō Hidemasa (Japan, active early century) ~ Ivory with staining, sumi, inlays

Dutchman Holding Puppy Jobun (Japan, active late 18th-early 19th century) Japan, late 18th century Costumes; Accessories Boxwood with inlays 3 3/4 x 15/16 x 11/16 in. (9.5 x 2.3 x 1.7 cm) Raymond and Frances Bushell Collection (M.90.186.20) Japanese Art Not currently on pu

Jobun (Japan) Dutchman Holding Puppy, late century Netsuke, Boxwood with inlays,

Dutchman with rooster-  // Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch traders arrived in Japanese ports from the mid-sixteenth century, but only the Dutch were officially allowed to remain in Japan after the national exclusion policy was enacted in 1638. Netsuke figures of foreigners often depict them wearing unusual clothing such as pantaloons and ruffled shirts, donning elaborate hats, and carrying exotic animals.   - ivory, artist unknown

Dutchman with rooster- // Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch traders arrived in Japanese ports from the mid-sixteenth century, but only the Dutch were officially allowed to remain in Japan after the national exclusion policy was enacted in 1638. Netsuke figures of foreigners often depict them wearing unusual clothing such as pantaloons and ruffled shirts, donning elaborate hats, and carrying exotic animals. - ivory, artist unknown

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