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Attractive kabuki portrait of Nakamura Fukusuke as a beauty playing a flute. An orange flickers in the sky at left, a sign of a supernatural event taking place. Chikanobu

Attractive kabuki portrait of Nakamura Fukusuke as a beauty playing a flute. An orange flickers in the sky at left, a sign of a supernatural event taking place.

三味線を演奏芸者と喜び四半期におけるシーン、(1864)、歌川国貞によって「歌舞伎」アクターの「浮世絵」木版画のアルバム::コレクション::アートギャラリーNSW

Scene in the pleasure quarters with geisha playing the samisen, album of 'ukiyo-e' woodblock prints of 'kabuki' actors by Utagawa KUNISADA :: The Collection

Ichirakutei Eisui Title:Tsukasa of the Ôgiya, kamuro Akeba and Kochô, from the series Beauties for the Five Festivals (Bijin gosekku) Date:1795-97

Ichirakutei Eisui Title:Tsukasa of the Ôgiya, kamuro Akeba and Kochô, from the series Beauties for the Five Festivals (Bijin gosekku)

Three Beauties: Snow - Utagawa Toyokuni, c.1810

Three Beauties: Snow Artist: Utagawa Toyokuni Completion Date: Place of Creation: Japan Style: Ukiyo-e

Ichikawa Ebizō IX (ninth) as Sukeroku from the Kabuki play Eighteen Best Plays of the Ichikawa Family, No. 1 from the series Leading Figures of the Modern Stage in Their Famous Roles | OTA MASAMITSU

OTA MASAMITSU - Japanese Woodblock Print - KABUKI ACTOR 1955

Ichikawa Ebizō IX (ninth) as Sukeroku from the Kabuki play Eighteen Best Plays of the Ichikawa Family, No. 1 from the series Leading Figures of the Modern Stage in Their Famous Roles

Utagawa Kunisada II (1823-1880) 歌川国定(二代) Charm of Beauy that isn’t losing against Plum Blossom or Snow 寒梅や雪にもまけぬ花の艶、1861 from the series Collection of Modern Beauties in The Tale of Genji 今様源氏花揃

Utagawa Kunisada II - Charm of Beauy that isn’t losing against Plum Blossom or Snow, 1861 from the series Collection of Modern Beauties in The Tale of Genji

The thick lines of kumadori makeup, often in reds and blues, had a practical purpose as well – they highlighted the actors’ faces in the theater, where artificial lighting was almost non-existent and the stage was darker than you could probably imagine today.

The thick lines of kumadori makeup, often in reds and blues, had a practical purpose as well – they highlighted the actors’ faces in the theater, where artificial lighting was almost non-existent and the stage was darker than you could probably imagine today.

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