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vaticination:  prediction; act of prophesying -- Cassandra

Cassandra of Troy - Doomed to see into the hearts of men and tell the truth but have no one ever listen to her or believe her. (I can relate)

"Peplophoros / Demeter" from the Villa of the Papyri or Pisoni at Herculaneum - Augustan age - End of the first century BC - Antiquarium of Boscoreale / Naples

"Peplophoros / Demeter" from the Villa of the Papyri or Pisoni at Herculaneum - Augustan age - End of the first century BC - Antiquarium of Boscoreale / Naples Ancient garb Roman

Bust of a young woman, possibly a priestess judging from her diadem and hairstyle,  late Roman era

Bust of a young woman, possibly a priestess judging from her diadem and hairstyle, late Roman era Reinette: Ancient Roman Hairstyles and Headdresses from the Severan to the Theodosian Dynasty

In Plato's Symposium the members of a party discuss the meaning of love. Socrates says that in his youth he was taught "the philosophy of love" by Diotima, who was a seer or priestess. Socrates also claims that Diotima successfully postponed the plague of Athens.

In Plato's Symposium the members of a party discuss the meaning of love. Socrates says that in his youth he was taught "the philosophy of love" by Diotima, who was a seer or priestess. Socrates also claims that Diotima successfully postponed the plague of Athens.

The Three Graces, Hellenistic, c. 2nd-1st Century BC. | © Phoenix Ancient Art 2011

They are, from youngest to oldest: Aglaea (“Splendor”), Euphrosyne (“Mirth”) and Thalia (“Good Cheer”). The Three Graces, Hellenistic, c. Century BC Graces (or Charites)

Statue of the priestess Eumachia (Tiberian age) - from Pompeii - Naples Archaeological Museum

Statue of the priestess Eumachia (Tiberian age) - from Pompeii - Naples Archaeological Museum

Encyclopedia of clothing and fashion: Earrings (History of)

Bust of woman during Roman empire - Bing Images

Mithras, 2nd Century, Roman. Excavated at Rome, now in British Museum, London, England.

Mitra was the god of the sun, of Persian origin that became part of the Roman Empire and his cult was developed as a mystery religion, and was organized in secret societies, exclusively male, esoteric and initiatory character. He enjoyed particular popula

Pportrait of a Roman lady, probably a priestess wearing tunic and stola. Above the forehead a hole, probably for a crown or diadem. Base after the antique. Middle Antonine Period, about 160 - 180 A.D

Pportrait of a Roman lady, probably a priestess wearing tunic and stola. Above the forehead a hole, probably for a crown or diadem. Middle Antonine Period, about 160 - 180 A.

Italy, Sicily, Taormina, Statue representing an Isis priestess, marble, 2nd Century B.C., Italy, Sicily, Palermo, Museo Archeologico Regionale (Archaeological Museum), Roman art

Italy, Sicily, Taormina, Statue representing an Isis priestess, marble, 2nd Century B.C., Italy, Sicily, Palermo, Museo Archeologico Regionale (Archaeological Museum), Roman art

Vestal Virgins were the priestesses of the Roman goddess of the hearth, Vesta, in the state religion of ancient Rome. At varying times there were four to six priestesses employed. They were the only full-time clergy (collegia) of a Roman deity which attests to the high regard in which the goddess was held. They tended the sacred fire in the shrine of Vesta in the Roman Forum and performed other rites associated with the goddess such as caring for the sacred objects in the shrine. -- AHE

Vestal Virgin

Simple forms and a restrained composition celebrate the resolve, innocence and moral authority of the Vestal Virgins. Herm of a Vestal Virgin, 1820 - Antonio Canova.

Roman Art

Mummy Portrait of a Woman, attributed to the Isidora Master -- Romano-Egyptian, El Hibeh, Egypt, about A.

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