Explore English Idioms, Figurative Language, and more!

Idiom of the day: Tongue-in-cheek. Meaning: Insincere, ironic or joking. Example: Ann made a tongue-in-cheek remark to John, and he got mad because he thought she was serious.

Idiom of the day: Tongue-in-cheek. Meaning: Insincere, ironic or joking. Example: Ann made a tongue-in-cheek remark to John, and he got mad because he thought she was serious.

Idiom of the day: Get your wires crossed.  Meaning: To misunderstand someone.  Example: Jenny got her wires crossed. I told her to email John, but she emailed James.  Origin: This expression transfers a wrongly wired telephone or telegraph connection to...

Idiom of the day: Get your wires crossed. Meaning: To misunderstand someone. Example: Jenny got her wires crossed. I told her to email John, but she emailed James. Origin: This expression transfers a wrongly wired telephone or telegraph connection to.

Idiom of the day: Use your loaf.  Meaning: Use your brain, think smart.  Example: Come on everyone, use your loaf, so we can solve this problem.

Idiom of the day: Use your loaf. Example: Come on everyone, use your loaf, so we can solve this problem.

Idiom of the day: Hear through the grapevine.  Meaning: To hear information from someone who heard it from someone else.  Example: I heard through the grapevine that she was pregnant, but I don’t know anything more.

Idiom of the day: Hear through the grapevine. Meaning: To hear information from someone who heard it from someone else. Example: I heard through the grapevine that she was pregnant, but I don’t know.

Idiom of the day: Give somebody a hand. Meaning: To help someone. Example: Could you give me a hand with these boxes?

Idiom of the day: Give somebody a hand. Meaning: To help someone. Example: Could you give me a hand with these boxes?

Call it a day

Idiom of the day: Call it a day. Meaning: To stop doing something, especially working. Example: I’m getting a bit tired now - let’s call it a day.

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