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Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy

Olive Trees -Vincent Van Gogh

Olive Trees -Vincent Van Gogh

"Bridges across the Seine at Asnieres" Vincent Van Gogh, water color

"Bridges across the Seine at Asnieres" Vincent Van Gogh, water color

Vincent van Gogh-La casa gialla

Vincent van Gogh-La casa gialla

la grande guerra - Cerca con Google

la grande guerra - Cerca con Google

Pardon Us (MGM, 1931). One Sheet (27" X 41"). Although Laurel and Hardy's first feature-length film is not particularly politically correct (the boys appear in blackface at one point), it's fondly remembered all the same. L & H play beer barons who get tossed in the clink and then escape to a cotton plantation. The bumbling jailbirds appear on this rare one sheet at the deft hand of legendary artist Al Hirschfeld.

Pardon Us (MGM, 1931). One Sheet (27" X 41"). Although Laurel and Hardy's first feature-length film is not particularly politically correct (the boys appear in blackface at one point), it's fondly remembered all the same. L & H play beer barons who get tossed in the clink and then escape to a cotton plantation. The bumbling jailbirds appear on this rare one sheet at the deft hand of legendary artist Al Hirschfeld.

0_94f31_c48ec245_orig.jpg (685×1024)

0_94f31_c48ec245_orig.jpg (685×1024)

Back To The Future 2 by Tchav

Back To The Future 2 by Tchav

Bookplate of The Bronx Free Library

Bookplate of The Bronx Free Library

Laurel And Hardy's "Sons Of The Desert" (1933). Stan and Ollie go to an out-of-town convention for all the lodges of the fraternal organization of which they are members--with the added benefit of getting them away from their shrewish wives. Wonderful slapstick ensues. Sadly Laurel and Hardy movies are--as critic Pauline Kael pointed out many years ago--paced much too leisurely for generations that didn't grow up on them. Such a shame, it's really marvelous stuff...

Laurel And Hardy's "Sons Of The Desert" (1933). Stan and Ollie go to an out-of-town convention for all the lodges of the fraternal organization of which they are members--with the added benefit of getting them away from their shrewish wives. Wonderful slapstick ensues. Sadly Laurel and Hardy movies are--as critic Pauline Kael pointed out many years ago--paced much too leisurely for generations that didn't grow up on them. Such a shame, it's really marvelous stuff...