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Palaeotragus by dustdevil on DeviantArt

Palaeotragus by ~dustdevil

REAL DINOSAUR POOP (aka. Corpolite)    Call it what you will: fossilized feces, Dino doo-doo or prehistoric fir cones, this 100 (possibly 200) million year old dinosaur dung was discovered in the bone beds of the Ancient Kingdom of Morocco. Each unique sample comes with a handy dandy microscope allowing you to get a close up look at a time when dinosaurs were roaming the earth and leaving their droppings behind.

REAL DINOSAUR POOP (aka. Corpolite) Call it what you will: fossilized feces, Dino doo-doo or prehistoric fir cones, this 100 (possibly 200) million year old dinosaur dung was discovered in the bone beds of the Ancient Kingdom of Morocco. Each unique sample comes with a handy dandy microscope allowing you to get a close up look at a time when dinosaurs were roaming the earth and leaving their droppings behind.

Pterodactyl fossil. Have you ever really wondered in what way an extinct animal or bird is a proof of evolution? What about those who didn't go extinct and still roam the Earth today essentially unchanged?

Have you ever really wondered in what way is an extinct animal or bird a proof of evolution? What about those who didn& go extinct and still roam the Earth today essentially unchanged?

Diabloceratops ( Devil Horned Head.) Discovered in southern #Utah in 2002. #dinosaur #fossil

Diabloceratops [dee-ab-lo-ser-a-tops] is an extinct genus of centrosaurine ceratopsian dinosaur that lived approximately 79 million years ago during the latter part of the Cretaceous Period in what is now Utah, in the United States

Anchiornis

For the first time, scientists have decoded the full-body color patterns of a dinosaur—the Anchiornis huxleyi (pictured)—a new study in the journal Science says.

Modern birds evolved gradually from their dinosaur ancestors, before diversifying into the thousands of species known today.

A revised view of the dinosaur family tree suggests birds didn't evolve in one fell swoop from their reptilian ancestors. Instead, our feathered friends evolved very gradually, at first.