ART ☰ I Macchiaioli

The movement grew from a small group of artists, many of whom had been revolutionaries in the uprisings of 1848. In the late 1850s, the artists met regularly at the Caffè Michelangiolo in Florence to discuss art and politics. They believed that areas of light and shadow, or "macchie" (literally patches or spots) were the chief components of a work of art. The word macchia was commonly used by Italian artists and critics in the nineteenth century to describe the sparkling quality of a drawing.
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Giovanni Segantini | Naviglio a Ponte San Marco, 1880

Giovanni Segantini | Naviglio a Ponte San Marco, 1880

Vincenzo Cabianca (Italian, 1827-1902), Effetto di sole, 1868-72. Oil on panel, 32 x 20 cm. Galleria d’arte moderna di Palazzo Pitti, Florence.

Vincenzo Cabianca (Italian, 1827-1902), Effetto di sole, 1868-72. Oil on panel, 32 x 20 cm. Galleria d’arte moderna di Palazzo Pitti, Florence.

Telemaco Signorini

Telemaco Signorini

Firenze, interno di un chiostro (San Marco), 1864-1865 ca – Giuseppe Abbati

Firenze, interno di un chiostro (San Marco), 1864-1865 ca – Giuseppe Abbati

Telemaco Signorini - Via Torta, Firenze. 1870.

Telemaco Signorini - Via Torta, Firenze. 1870.

Telemaco_Signorini__Strada_a_Pozzolatico__

Telemaco_Signorini__Strada_a_Pozzolatico__

Silvestro Lega

Silvestro Lega

"Return of the Wood" by Giovanni Segantini

"Return of the Wood" by Giovanni Segantini

Raffaello Sernesi Ladruncoli di fichi

Raffaello Sernesi Ladruncoli di fichi

Telemaco Signorini  Contadina con gerla e cane (Firenze 1835 - Firenze 1901) 1895

Telemaco Signorini Contadina con gerla e cane (Firenze 1835 - Firenze 1901) 1895

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