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Pilgrim flask - Holy land pottery vase - Israelite vase - Judea vase - Canaanite vase
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Roman clay pilgrim flask, 1st century A.D. Eatern Mediterranean Holy land pottery pilgrim flask with one little handle used to carry Holy water from pilgrims, 18.2 cm high. Private collection

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Ancient artifacts

Holy Land pottery spouted strainer jug, Hebron, Iron Age, 800 B.C. Vessel intended not only to contain a liquid, but also to filter it, the jug was wheel turned, while the handle and the spout were made by hand. The object has a globular body and a tall, narrow, concave neck, with the trough-like spout extending upwards, there are strainer holes in the body where the spout joins, 22 cm high. Private collection

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Ancient artifacts

Pilgrim flask, Coptic Egypt, 480- 650 A.D. Depicting Saint Menas on eithe side, flanked by camels, his arms outstretched in blessing, above each arm is a quincunx, representing a cross, all within a beaded circular border. These small flasks were probably produced at the pilgrimage center of Abu Mena, south-west of Alexandria, to sell to the devout as a souvenir of a visit and have been deduced to have contained holy water or oil from the shrine, 9.5 high. Private collection

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Ancient artifacts

Byzantine lamp with 5 wick-holes, Holy Land, 7th- 8th Century A.D. The body square in shape, the central fill-hole flanked by floral elements, all within a raised geometric border, five wick-holes across the front, handle is tall and flat and comprised of conjoined arches, each with raised decoration featuring two facing busts of saints within an arched window supported on either side and at center by columns, 8.9 cm long. Private collection

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Ancient artifacts

Holy Land spoutet juglet, Early Bronze Age, 3rd millenium B.C. With a basket handle, decorated in red paint with a netting pattern on one side and what appears to be both a netting and banding pattern on the other side, the short spout emerges from the rounded body and has a flaring mouth. Two small holes are on either side of the neck, likely as another method of suspension. Private collection

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Ancient artifacts

Holy land pottery spouted strainer jug, 800 B.C. The jug was wheel turned, while the handle and the spout were made by hand, has a globular body and a tall, narrow, concave neck, with the trough-like spout extending upwards; there are strainer holes in the body where the spout joins. Such a structure is very unlike jugs which are simply intended for pouring, where the handle would logically be on the opposite side of the vessel from the spout, 22 cm high. Private collection

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Ancient artifacts