Ancient games and sport

Greek games - Roman games - Roman bronze strigil - Astragalus - Roman gaming pieces - Egyptian games - Greek games - Ephedrismos
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Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target  on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target  on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Greek games, Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target  on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target  on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, 340 B.C. Ephedrismos on Paestan bottle, Paestan red figured painted bottle from painter of Naples 1778, unpublished, attribuited by Prof. Ian MacPhee, 19.3 cm high. Ephedrismos was game where a target on the ground is to be hit with a rock or a ball, the loser had to carry the winner, who covered the loser's eyes, on his back until he touched the target with his foot. Private collection

Roman games, Roman bronze strigil, 1st-2nd century A.D. A fabricated strigil with concave sharply-curved scraping surface, panels of incised geometric detail to the outer face, the handle formed as a hollow rectangular block with panels of punched-point scroll detail to the reverse, 27 cm high. Private collection

Roman games, Roman bronze strigil, 1st-2nd century A.D. A fabricated strigil with concave sharply-curved scraping surface, panels of incised geometric detail to the outer face, the handle formed as a hollow rectangular block with panels of punched-point scroll detail to the reverse, 27 cm high. Private collection

Greek games, Ephedrismos, Greek terracotta ephedrismos group, 4th-3rd century B.C. Showing two piggy back girls, playing the game of ephedrismos, the upper figure holding a discus, with pigment remaining, 18 cm high. Private collection

Greek games, Ephedrismos, Greek terracotta ephedrismos group, 4th-3rd century B.C. Showing two piggy back girls, playing the game of ephedrismos, the upper figure holding a discus, with pigment remaining, 18 cm high. Private collection

Roman bronze twenty sided die icosahedron, 1st-2nd century A.D. Private collection

Roman bronze twenty sided die icosahedron, 1st-2nd century A.D. Private collection

Ephedrismos, girls playing ephedrismos, Greek pottery statuette, 3rd century B.C. Corinth, 26 cm high. Hermitage museum

Ephedrismos, girls playing ephedrismos, Greek pottery statuette, 3rd century B.C. Corinth, 26 cm high. Hermitage museum

Roman games, Etruscan bronze strigil, 2nd century B.C. Roman games, Etruscan bronze strigil, 22 cm high. Private collection

Roman games, Etruscan bronze strigil, 2nd century B.C. Roman games, Etruscan bronze strigil, 22 cm high. Private collection

Roman games, Etruscan and Roman bronze strigils, 3rd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. Roman games, the strigil is a tool for the cleansing of the body by scraping off dirt, perspiration, and oil that were applied before bathing, in ancient Greek and Roman cultures the strigil was primarily of use to men, specifically male athletes, however in Etruscan culture there is evidence of strigils being used by both sexes,  27 cm high max. Private collection

Roman games, Etruscan and Roman bronze strigils, 3rd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. Roman games, the strigil is a tool for the cleansing of the body by scraping off dirt, perspiration, and oil that were applied before bathing, in ancient Greek and Roman cultures the strigil was primarily of use to men, specifically male athletes, however in Etruscan culture there is evidence of strigils being used by both sexes, 27 cm high max. Private collection

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